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2003 chevy trailblazer_lt
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Thank you very much for putting this procedure up. It went mostly to plan except that removing the hub from the shaft took a lot of effort for me. My simple 2 jaw puller eventually got the job done using the turn and tap method plus some patience and PB blaster. I also bent up the backing plate pretty good with all the fumbling around I did, but I have that mostly worked out now. Again, thank you!
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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25 Posts
Bearing change easy breezy

Just wanted to thank eeehabt for the tutorial. I did the other side a few years ago before I found the forum, so it was great to have all the photos and input from everyone. Things went MUCH smoother this time. I especially like the idea about salvaging the studs. I woulda never thought of that.
Anyway, I appreciate you guys a lot! Thanks!
 

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2007 chevy trailblazer_ls
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30 Posts
A couple years ago a wheel hub/bearing assembly was done on the truck under warranty. I couldnt remember what side GM fixed, so I went back to the dealership and using my VIN I was able to determine that GM had done the drivers side hub. Armed with this info. I went back and did some swerving and everytime I swerved to the right, the unloading of the passenger side bearing eliminated the noise/vibration. Loading the passenger side by swerving to the left, made the passenger side bearing SLIGHTLY more noisy.

I ended up installing a new Timken hub assembly. Listed at CAN$519, I got it for CAN$240, Rock Auto has it listed at CAN$148.00 for TIMKEN Part # 513188. AFter I removed the big 36mm nut off of the halfshaft, single wack with a good hammer and the splines popped free easily. I brushed some antiseive on the splines to ensure easy removal next time Im in there. After I torqued the wheels to 100 lb/ft and dropped the truck back on the ground I torqued the 36mm halfhaft nut to the 103 lb/ft spec.

While I was in there I also installed a new passenger side outer tie rod end MOOG Part # ES3676 which listed locally for CAN$204 I got it for CAN$117. Rock Auto has it listed for CAN$61.98. This is a "Problem Solver" tierod end as it includes a zerk fitting to allow grease to be injected. No such greasability with the OEM part.


After I installed the hub and tierod I did an alignment and the truck tracks much better now and all noises/vibrations are gone. Toe in spec is 1.2mm or 0.050". I measured and counted turns when removing the old tierod end, 19 revolutions out, so I used 19 rotations up re-assembly. This ended up giving me about 3/4 of an inch of negative toe so I re-adjusted and came to the OEM spec.

My Father (while alive) being a self employed collison/front end/frame mechanic, really came in handy, His shop has all the frame/body/alignment spec books and all the alignment tools and alignment rack for pretty much every Domestic vehicle.
pic of the shop alignment rack and metal bench and overhead hoist, Dad built every thing you see and worked there for 3 decades. The vertical beams you see on either side of teh rack are for pulling out to the side, while the red hydraulic ram on bench to left is used to pull vehicles from front to back, there are 2 anchors to chain the rear of the vehilce while pulling from the front.


I rotated the tires and discovered that the passenger front tire was cupped from the tierod end being bad. Simply rotating the tires took away some of the vibration through the steering wheel.

BTW I am shocked at the price difference between the USA and Canada. Rock Auto's shipping would have added from CAN$48-$118 for the tierod end and wheel hub assembly. Figure in the 8% dutyfor Auto Parts(which is a category 4 commodity at the border) and 5% plus for Provincial taxes, and the costs start to build. Plus if I had to return a part back to the US, the costs keep adding up Timken 513188 hub/bearing assy. for $137 on Ebay and the Moog outer tie rod end ES3676 for $53

Drives like a new truck. Solid diagnosis and internet help really paid off.
Thanks guys.


Peace
Hog
 

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2006 chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
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1 Posts
Grateful thankful!!

:yes:
Any comments???
Hi all, :)

Yesterday I changed the Front Wheel Bearing of my truck. I took photos of the process for all to benefit from.

Photo 1:
Loosen the axle and the wheel nuts. Jack the truck up.

Photo 2:
Secure the rear wheel by placing the wheel locks behind and in front of it. Wheel locks come along with every truck.

Photo 3:
Remove the two bolts that hold the Brake assembly. Make sure that you start the engine every time you turn the steering wheel in order not to damage the steering rack assembly.

Photo 4 (2 photos):
Free the ABS sensor cable from all its mounting points and unplug it.

Photo 5:
Take the Brake Assembly off. Secure it in a way that protects the brake hose from damage.

Photo 6:
Hold the Brake Disc at the points shown and pull it out the hub. Careful not to touch the soft surface just to keep it clean and grease free.

Photo 7:
The bolts that hold the hub containing the bearing.

Photo 8A:
Remove the two bolts first. Then, turn the steering wheel all the way right to reach the third bolt. Make sure that you start the engine every time you turn the steering wheel in order not to damage the steering rack assembly.

Photo 8B:
The location of the third bolt that holds the hub. You can use closed end wrenches or sockets. I loosen and tighten with the first and remove with an automatic wrench. (The shoe has nothing to do with the process). :crackup:

Photo 9:
Place a nut on a wheel bolt and gently hammer it out. This is if you want to keep the bolts for future use as they get damaged easily especially when you don't remove them for a long period of time, like a year or more, or when your bad luck takes to a lousy craftsman who damages them for you.
By the way, using the truck with one of the nuts lost damages the wheel ring and causes lack of track control.

Photo 10:
Squeeze a regular screwdriver at the point shown with arrows and pull the bearing out. Installation is the reverse but don't forget to place the big O ring on the hub before installing it.

Photo 11:
To install a bolt back in the hub, make sure that you support the hub with a long socket to prevent bending it when you hammer the bolt in. It's clear in the photo. (You can use a hydraulic press if available)

Photo 12:
In order not to end up with lost bolts or nuts, or forgotten to return ones, I advise that you get yourselves a magnetic plate like the one shown here. it holds your bolts and nuts tight even if you work under the truck and you mount it on the chassis face down. Mine is Toptools brand. It's very cheap.
The other arrow shows where you should keep the wheel while working. This location prevents damage to the truck if the jack fails to hold it and in case it slips or falls.

That's all for now. It was a very easy thing to do.
Thank you for this excellent post with pictures. I am new and you have sold me on this forum. I am grateful for you caring and sharing. I am hopeful that in the future I may share and pay it forward. GRACIAS Amigo!
 

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2003 isuzu ascender
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2 Posts
Passenger noisy @ only 75K miles

Ran down my noise coming into passenger-side window and turns out it is my front wheel hub bearing occasionally sounding off. Time to get dirty again.
 

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2005 gmc envoy_denali
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2 Posts
will be doing mine this fall

Will be doing mine this fall. Does the rotor come off without removing the hub. Will be replacing the hub but would be nice if I don't have to do it like my Colorado.
 

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2004 gmc envoy_sle
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5 Posts
Thanks to Trailvoy

I was able to do this job myself and save this working man a nice chunk of change. By the way I had 209,448 miles on these bearing which were original. Thanks again for those who make this site possible.:thumbsup:
 

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2007 chevy trailblazer_ls
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3 Posts
Good post. Thanks!

Hi all, :)

Yesterday I changed the Front Wheel Bearing of my truck. I took photos of the process for all to benefit from. [snip]
eeehabt, Thanks for an informative write-up and great pics.

All I can add is one possible shortcut; if you're not replacing pads or rotors, it's possible to slide the caliper back an inch or two off the rotor and take both the caliper and rotor off together. It makes for a pretty heavy assembly to hang but a five gallon bucket at the front of the wheel well will support it while the hub is replaced.
 

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2003 gmc envoy_slt
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1 Posts
Did my passenger side this afternoon. This write-up and pictures were very helpful. Also watched a couple YouTube videos to help get me prepared.

Very helpful to raise the whole front of the vehicle so you can easily turn the steering wheel and articulate the assembly to your liking depending on which bolts you're attacking. The caliper bracket bolts were the toughest to break, and always seem to be for me, anyway. Nothing a cheater bar and some muscle can't handle. You definitely want a small socket extension for the 3 hub bolts because your ratchet won't fit with the CV boot right there. Some offset wrenches might work depending on how much they're offset. ABS sensor cable clips are various kinds, require a little flat head screwdriver and are a little tedious but no biggie.

For what it's worth, I replaced a Moog version that was installed just 23,000 miles ago. A little disappointed in that, as Moog seems to have a good reputation on here. No off-roading or anything, but my Envoy does live on Michigan roads, so who knows what made it go bad. The other side, also a Moog, is doing fine at about 34,000 miles. Went with a Timken this time ($134.88 on Amazon), so we'll see how it does.

The center nut on the hub is a deep 35mm. (Sounds like this may be different if you have aftermarket half shafts, but this is easy to check if you just pop off the plastic lug nut cover on the wheel without doing anything else). A regular depth socket I borrowed from my buddy definitely was not deep enough. Luckily, Advance Auto Parts sells a deep 35mm socket for 17 bucks and it is impact grade. Watch your torque specs on the caliper slide bolts. Many places list those at like 80-ish lbs. which is way too much. 31 lbs. was what I found for mine, and "felt" about right.

Mix in a YouTube video with this thread and it's definitely a doable project for anyone who is careful and can jack up the truck properly. Sorry if any of this is redundant, just wanted to add to an already super-helpful thread and encourage anyone who is on the fence to avoid labor costs on this one.
 

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2007 chevy trailblazer_ls
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3 Posts
1) Most people have said if you're getting noise on a left turn, you need to change the right bearing, and vice-versa. It was the opposite for me though. I swapped out the right bearing first, since left turns were making the most noise. Well, after I finished, I took it for a quick test drive, and left turns were as noisy as ever, but the right was quiet. Thought I screwed something up :crazy: The next morning I did the left side bearing and everything was dandy on both sides.
I had the same experience: Noise was from the left on left turn. Because I was replacing both right and left hubs, it didn't matter much.

After installation, I found that the left hub was gritty when load was pushed in (inner bearing loaded) but OK when load was pulled out (load on outer bearing). Right was stiff but smooth when thrust was against either inner & outer bearings.

Bottom line: if you're going to replace only one hub, replace the noisy one. I suspect that whether noise comes up on left or right turn depends mostly on whether the inner or outer bearing on the noisy hub is at fault.
 

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2007 chevy trailblazer_ls
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3 Posts
Front wheel bearing question

I have a 2007 Trailblazer 2WD with 140+K miles. The front just started growling, and I'm confident it is the RF wheel bearings. My question: all the videos I see for replacing the hub assembly show 4WD trucks. Are the parts and the process the same for the 2WD? Looks fairly straight forward.
 

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2009 saab 9_7x
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89 Posts
I’ll preface with I’ve never done this on a two wheel drive but I assume it would be a little bit easier since you do not need to remove the drive axle nut which can be a pain without an impact.

I would recommend replacing them both as long as you are there. It seems like whenever I do one the other side would fail. My 2004 I ran to 155k and my 2009 just hit 140k. I’ve been replacing them at 70k intervals. The wheel bearings and exhaust manifold are the only things I feel like I replace about the same mileage.

Good luck!
 

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2007 chevy trailblazer_ls
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343 Posts
Did my RF on 2007 2WD with 120K last year. Simple job. Didn't have to turn steering. Did have to use some force to get rear bolt on hub out. Other than that it was much easier than what is described getting the shaft of a 4WD out and in. On the 2WD the shaft is just totally missing leaving a hole. Just make sure you are careful hanging the brake rotor and disconnecting and reconnecting the wheel speed sensor.
 
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