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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some help.

Recently bought a 2008 Chevy Trailblazer V6...base model..is that an LS? Anyway, towing capacity is 5400lbs, but receiver hitch from Chevy dealer rates it at 5000lb max, so I'm going with that.

Looking at purchasing a travel trailer. The RV dealers are saying that you can pull one based on the dry weight of the TT.....I'm not so sure about that.

I am looking that GVRWs of the TTs....isn't that the smarter and safer way to go? That is, when looking at TTs, I'm looking at the specs that state the GVRWs and going for the TTs that are rated at no more than 5000lbs.

What do you say?

Thanks!!!!
 

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2004 chevy trailblazer_ls
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You should be looking at the dry/empty weight plus the contents. So, if you are looking at a TT that has a dry weight of 4K lbs, then give yourself 1K lbs of wiggle room for the storage tanks, LP, food, clothes, etc etc etc.

You would also want to look into a tranny cooler. Not expensive and probably a 4 on the install scale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So to err on the side of safety, I should really look at the GVRW of the travel trailer right? Oftentimes the dry weight of the TT is listed and may not even include options. My guess is that the GVRW is including all options and CC and would be safer to go with for total towing load? I want to be safe.

Sometimes I just wonder if salespeople just tell you whatever just to sell something.
 

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I would still look at the dry weight. The GVRW may be a lot higher depending on the size of the axles.(Some manufacturers will install light axles and others heavier axles)
If you take the dry weight and assume that it does not include any options that trailer may have AC, spare tire, propane tanks etc. Then add the weight of the options, the dealer should be able to provide this and finally add the "stuff" you will take with you. The average that two people will add is another 1000 lbs of "stuff" to a RV trailer (believe me if you add it all up :) )

I have a 30 travel trailer that I tow with a dry weight of 4200 lbs, I have taken it across weigh scales and it weighs 5500 lbs without the water.

That being said I am at or near the limit that I am comfortable towing using my current Weight Distribution system but you should never go beyond what your Trailblazer is rated for.

Cheers
 

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2007 chevy trailblazer_ls
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So to err on the side of safety, I should really look at the GVRW of the travel trailer right? Oftentimes the dry weight of the TT is listed and may not even include options. My guess is that the GVRW is including all options and CC and would be safer to go with for total towing load? I want to be safe.
You can do that... That will very safely account for not only the options, but also your generator, generator fuel, dishes, some water if you need to tow wet for some reason, etc...

Sometimes I just wonder if salespeople just tell you whatever just to sell something.
It's not something to wonder, but something to KNOW...

Mike

ETA: disregard the numbers on the hitch... the number in the manual is the one you're looking at...
 

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2004 gmc envoy_sle
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You can do that... That will very safely account for not only the options, but also your generator, generator fuel, dishes, some water if you need to tow wet for some reason, etc...



It's not something to wonder, but something to KNOW...

Mike

ETA: disregard the numbers on the hitch... the number in the manual is the one you're looking at...
:iagree:

Always go with the max weight of the TT, that way your safe. Also you need to realize the total combined weight you can tow. The tow amounts listed for your vehicle does not include passengers or cargo in the truck so those actualy decrease what you can tow. A good salesman will spend time finding trailers you can safely tow and not just what you can afford. Our sales team sits down with you first to figure out what you can tow and what's best for you. Look for a dealer that wants you to be safe and happy and not just a quick sign on the line. And buy from a dealer with a full service shop. You'll need work done and you'll see the service shop way more then the sales side so make sure they are equiped to handle all your needs. Oh and use a weight distribution hitch:tiphat
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the responses. A lot to think on and research.

Unfortunately I've been on the receiving end of salespeople trying to sell you something even when you definitely DO NOT have the right tow vehicle. Before considering the TT, I was looking at a ski boat and I had a 2004 Honda CRV rated only at 1500 lbs and had 2 dealers try to sell me a ski boat that was way over the tow rating and told me it was safe. Needless to say that I am no longer interested in doing business with them. I recently rented a lightweight TT and after the rental (and a great time), talked to a salesperson and they attempted to sell me a 24' TT with a dry weight of 4300lbs and to just add 500lbs. I was initially excited to hear that I should only consider the dry weight, but decided to do more research on it. Thus here I am.
 

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Salespeople lie. In other astonishing news, the sun will rise in the east tomorrow morning.

;)

Talking about the dry weight is such a bad tactic that it should be illegal. The gross weight is the number that will be analyzed in court to apportion liability if there was ever an accident and you went even a pound over the GM specs.
 

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I would still look at the dry weight. The GVRW may be a lot higher depending on the size of the axles.(Some manufacturers will install light axles and others heavier axles)
If you take the dry weight and assume that it does not include any options that trailer may have AC, spare tire, propane tanks etc. Then add the weight of the options, the dealer should be able to provide this and finally add the "stuff" you will take with you. The average that two people will add is another 1000 lbs of "stuff" to a RV trailer (believe me if you add it all up :) )

I have a 30 travel trailer that I tow with a dry weight of 4200 lbs, I have taken it across weigh scales and it weighs 5500 lbs without the water.

That being said I am at or near the limit that I am comfortable towing using my current Weight Distribution system but you should never go beyond what your Trailblazer is rated for.

Cheers
I dont agree with you.1000# is a heck of a lot of stuff.Also,read tire inflation ratings,add all tires together at max air press and get close to max vehicle weight with"stuff".
 

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:iagree:

Always go with the max weight of the TT, that way your safe. Also you need to realize the total combined weight you can tow. The tow amounts listed for your vehicle does not include passengers or cargo in the truck so those actualy decrease what you can tow. A good salesman will spend time finding trailers you can safely tow and not just what you can afford. Our sales team sits down with you first to figure out what you can tow and what's best for you. Look for a dealer that wants you to be safe and happy and not just a quick sign on the line. And buy from a dealer with a full service shop. You'll need work done and you'll see the service shop way more then the sales side so make sure they are equiped to handle all your needs. Oh and use a weight distribution hitch:tiphat
:iagree:
I was told some of the tt dry weight is also before adding pptions like airconditioner, awning, tv and stuff like that. My camper is only dry 2000 but add all the extras its alot more than that. I would go by max weight.
 

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I was going to start a new thread on this. I hope i can just jump in here. I also have been looking into purchasing a TT. I was told yesterday by a salesman that he didnt think i would ever be happy towing a TT with my 04 envoy SLT XUV. He thinks even with EQ hitch and sway control a TT is going to pull me around. Any input here on accuracy of this?
 

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A 6000 pound trailer - you're going to notice. Unhappiness is entirely in your perception. But a trailer and contents that are within your specified capacity, especially with a WD hitch and sway control, are not going to be a horrible challenge.

The trailvoy platform was DESIGNED to be a decent tow vehicle - note that EVERY one came with a factory 2" receiver. It's not an option. There are no aftermarket suppliers because they all have it. GM removed the underhood light after 2002 to save a dime but they always had the towing receiver. Tells me something about the market they designed it for.

What kind of TT were you looking at when you met this goofy and underinformed sales person?
 

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We are looking at something in the 19' to 24' range. Light weight. we really like the Thor wanderer 239BH its a 23 foot Bunk house with 1 manual slide. I believe it to be under the specified weight.
 

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We are looking at something in the 19' to 24' range. Light weight. we really like the Thor wanderer 239BH its a 23 foot Bunk house with 1 manual slide. I believe it to be under the specified weight.
Im trying to come up with a Casita,Burro,Scamp,etc.They weigh between 950-1100# and hitch weight of 140-165.Hard to find!!!
 

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We are looking at something in the 19' to 24' range. Light weight. we really like the Thor wanderer 239BH its a 23 foot Bunk house with 1 manual slide. I believe it to be under the specified weight.
Your salesman may be one of the few honest ones out there. He is telling you that your truck will pull the trailer but it will not be enjoyable. IMO your truck will pull the trailer on flat land but hills will not be fun and due to the short wheel base of a tb a 23' trailer is too long in strong winds and will push your tb around. Trust me from my own experiences towing at the top end of spec is not fun - leave yourself some breathing room and either downsize the tt or upgrade the tv.
 

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I've never pulled a travel trailer with my Envoy XL, I have pulled a trailer loaded with a car and experienced no difficulty, but a friend who also has the standard Envoy purchased a 24' bumper pull trailer and sold it after two outings. He said it felt like the trailer was pulling him around too much, so he went with a fifth wheel to pull with his truck.
It would be nice if they would let you hook up to a trailer and pull it for about 30 miles.
 

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Im a new guy with a new tb (05) also wanting to buy a travel trailer.
The more I read, the more confused I get. I want to pull a 21 or 23 ft hybrid tt
what do I need
What's confusing? You need a trailer that weighs less than your tow rating, which is listed in your Owner's Manual. Arrange to have as much headroom as possible (trailer weight as low as possible compared to your tow rating.)

Lots of web sites with towing advice. We can advise better if you would share what specifically is the most confusing part. Weight? Brakes? Length? Weight Distributing Hitch? Anti-sway.

Try starting here:
http://editorial.autos.msn.com/article.aspx?cp-documentid=434834

and then asking specific questions. "What do I need?" is a bit too broad to begin with. It's like "How do I start a family?" Do you need to know how to get a woman to marry you, or how to impregnate the one you have already? :crackup:
 
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