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Hey guys,

2003 Envoy SLT, 4x4, 4.2.

Trying to change left rear tire. Jacked up, all lugs off. Tire won't budge. I've kicked it, hammered at it, tried to pry it off. Simply won't budge. I don't believe that this model has any kind of wheel lock, does it?

Any help would be appreciated.


Gary
 

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2009 chevy
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Been there, not fun.

Sometimes, you can use the truck to break it loose.
Put the lug nuts back on, almost on. Leave just a little loose.
Start truck (put into D or R) and give it a poke of gas.
May be enough to break to rust/dirt holding it on.

If you don't like that idea (and it's not one of my best), spray a little penetrating oil and let sit for a few hours.
 

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2003 chevy trailblazer_lt
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probably a rusty brake disc... penitrating oil is ur best bet.. no other wheel locks... spray around the center and each stud..

had this on my old truck.. put on spare and it wouldnt come off cause teh center of the spare was just a little to small for the hub... took alot of kicking and wiggling..
 

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2003 gmc envoy_slt
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If you use penetrating oil, before you put the wheel back on, make sure you get any oil off the brake rotor. It is also a good idea to put a very light coat of anti-seize, grease , or oil on the face of the rotor where it buts up to the wheel. This is definitely not a problem you want on the side of a busy highway.:m2:
 

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2006 chevy trailblazer_lt
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I had this problem one time on my son's vehicle. The penetrating oil & anti-sieze compound are great ideas. To easily get the wheel off after using the penetrating oil use a 12# sledge hammer and a big block of wood. Works every time.
 

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Yep, I've had to use a sledge hammer on steel wheels on a number of occasions. And I've seen "mechanics" in tire stores do it as well. Sometimes they used heat on the steel around the center opening, but this was in extreme cases.

Usually the center opening seizes to the center "bump" in the axle.

Antiseize, after some light sanding, is definitely recommended.
 

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2004 gmc
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It is also a good idea to put a very light coat of anti-seize, grease , or oil on the face of the rotor where it buts up to the wheel.
Sorry I didn't see this earlier. I really, really think this is a bad idea. Hub to wheel friction is the ONLY thing that prevents movement of the wheel relative to the studs. Threaded studs are only stressed in tension, and it's the flat friction of those two surfaces that keeps the wheel fixed in place. A slippery surface might let the wheel rotate and stress the studs in shear, where they're a lot less strong.

Drag racers send thousands of HP through the wheel/hub interface using friction created by stud tension forces.

I recommend wire brushing rust and oxidation off the surfaces to make sure they're both bright metal.
 
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