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2005 saab 9_7x
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone. I've used your forum for a couple years as a research lurker and finally have a problem I'd like to get your opinions on.

I have a 2005 SAAB 97x with the 4.2 I6 engine and 70k miles. Recently the transmission cooler line started to leak from one of the couplers between the cooler and transmission. I was thinking about cutting out the corroded part which is about 4 inches and securing a generic transmission cooler hose there with clamps. I know some people here have done this and was wondering how this type of fix is fairing for you? Did you have to do anything else to prep the line other than cutting and cleaning it up? Should I avoid using a dremel or angle grinder on the line?

I also wanted to clean and degrease the rest of the lines and spray them with rustoluem, grill paint, undercarriage, or bed liner sealer. Does that sound like a good idea? What temperatures would I expect on the lines?

Thanks in advance!

EDIT: After doing some thinking, I should probably get a pipe cutter and flaring kit. I'm sure debris from a dremel or angle grinder is not good for a transmission ;)
 

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2002 gmc envoy_slt
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3,203 Posts
Depends where the leak is. In my case, it was down against the catalytic converter. The line had actually rubbed through against the converter, don't know why and the replacement line doesn't even go near it! (I'm thinking the line was bent during service, as I'm the original owner). I had no choice but to replace the line, as rubber next to the converter wasn't going to last very long.

If it's the union of the front and rear lines, up on the inside of the fender. (The lines are 2 pieces, front & rear and join inside the upper fender well). If the rear pipe is intact, there will be a nice ripple in the line to hold the rubber line on, just slip it over with a clamp and you're good. To separate the lines, pull the plastic retainer back and use a small tool to remove the clip, then pull them a part....it may take some effort to separate them.

If you do need to cut one of the lines, buy a cheap pipe/tubing cutter and don't saw/dremel the metal line. The tubing/pipe cutting tool leaves a nice smooth, downward edge which prevents cutting the rubber line and debri/shavings that might damage the transmission. (Those little cutters are under $10 at any home improvement store). To joint the rubber to the cut line, use TWO(2) clamps and rotated 180 degrees from each other, approximately 1/2 to 1 inch a part and you're good. For clamps, I used fuel injection hose clamps, they're rated for 80-120PSI of pressure and hold better than the worm drive cheapo clamps. (No way one of those will allow the hose to pull off).
 

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2005 saab 9_7x
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2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks ylab! :thumbsup:

I took your advice and got a cheap tube cutter at Harbor Freight, it was tight, but worked like a charm. I got the transmission cooler hoses and 4 fuel injection hose clamps like you said (2 for each end, 180 degrees from each other). Over all I don't think I even went over $20 bucks. The corrosion in that area was worse than I thought originally and ended up cutting out more than I planned to be safe. But it's fixed, no more dripping fluid. Saved countless $100s taking it to a dealer...

Again, thank you for the advice!
 
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