Chevy TrailBlazer, TrailBlazer SS and GMC Envoy Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i was on wheeladapter.com and they have 3/4" spacers for $140 a set, i want to run 265/75/16 bfg all terrains with a 2" bds lift will 3/4" give me enough clearence, or will i need 1.5" spacers like a lot of guys on here. i want to get the smallest spacers without rubbing
 

·
Registered
2004 chevy trailblazer_ls
Joined
·
3,329 Posts
the problem with thin spacers is that the lugs will stick out further than they should. The smallest I've seen used on TVs is 1.25", and even then, the lugs needed to be shaved down a couple of millimeters...

that size tires is about a 32" overall, which is the size I'm running. I have 1.5" spacers and have plenty of clearance to the upper ball joints. I had a lot of rubbing on the plastic fender liners. I had to cut a lot of plastic off. JamesDowning is running the same set up, and he didn't have to cut anything...

You can see how much I had to cut, here... http://forums.trailvoy.com/showthread.php?t=55332 - last post...
 

·
Banned
2004 gmc
Joined
·
26,181 Posts
Agreed. If you got thin spacers, and the studs stuck through, you'd only be able to use them if you had a wheel that you could drill relief holes into the back of the mounting surface.

For instance, this wheel comes cast with such relief cavities:



There are thin, thin items we call shims (and the manufacturers often call spacers) that don't have their own studs, and rely on the OEM stud to continue on to the wheel, but those might get you 3/16" or 1/4" movement and that's hardly ever enough for decently upsized offroad tires. They're usually just for ricers. (hint: We mock ricers... ;) )

 

·
Registered
2003 chevy trailblazer_ls
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Agreed. If you got thin spacers, and the studs stuck through, you'd only be able to use them if you had a wheel that you could drill relief holes into the back of the mounting surface.

For instance, this wheel comes cast with such relief cavities:



There are thin, thin items we call shims (and the manufacturers often call spacers) that don't have their own studs, and rely on the OEM stud to continue on to the wheel, but those might get you 3/16" or 1/4" movement and that's hardly ever enough for decently upsized offroad tires. They're usually just for ricers. (hint: We mock ricers... ;) )

The biggest problem with the above type is ensuring that the the lugs are getting enough turns onto the studs to render them safe. They make them up to around 3/4" but I wouldn't trust them myself.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top