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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am replacing my Cam Shaft position sensor and actuator solenoid. In doing so I noticed alot of sludge buildup. I have understood that using seafoam was the best bet, however there are no directions for use on the bottle. How much do I add, and where? I have seen people talking about adding strait into the oil, adding it through a vacuum line, and in the fuel. Recommendations please?
 

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Great video Roadie!:hail: Only wish I had watched it 2 months ago, lol. I also wish I could find there other products in this part of the country!:yes:
 

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Sea Foam has a new straw out for the deep creep that's about 3 feet long with the end plugged off and 3 tiny orfices coming out the side so it sprays in multiple directions it looks like it would work pretty good for putting deep into and intake to clean. The sea foam rep. gave me one last week i just haven't used it yet.
 

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i've used seamfoam i only have 50000kms but it works wonders :thumbsup:
 

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Anyway like the guy in the video said ad a 1/3 of it the oil. Do you do alot of short trips with your trailvoy???
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks a bunch for the video. I search and searched and wasn't able to find anything. I plan on taking care of this tomorrow, before setting out on a 3 hour trip to Indianapolis. I am going to go the 1/3 1/3 1/3 route. I figure it all could use a good cleaning, considering I am at 185,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Can you define soon after for me please? From what I have read it looks like I can run it for 1000 - 1500 miles and should then change the oil. Is that about accurate?
 

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Can you define soon after for me please? From what I have read it looks like I can run it for 1000 - 1500 miles and should then change the oil. Is that about accurate?
I would say more like 100 miles, its a cleaner not an additive.
 

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I would ask myself some questions; What is the problem that you are trying to solve? Is it smoking? Is it running poorly? Has your mileage dropped significantly in the last few months?

The chances are that the build up you are seeing is doing no harm what so-ever. The chances of the solvents in a product like Seafoam doing damage are much greater. I typically drive my vehicles until they have 150k to 175k, then most of them end up with family members who put another 100k on them. I've yet to see any real, long term benefits to using oil additives and cleaning products. Regular oil changes, whether you believe in every 3k, or 7k, doesn't matter, you must be regular about it, are really all that's needed.

Now, I will say that products to clean the fuel system are a little different. Gas leaves a lot crud behind that builds up and causes problems for moving parts and fuel injectors. We all know about the benefits of cleaning the throttle body on the TB, and I've owned a couple of other cars that needed the same thing done regularly. Those of us who fondly remember carburetors also recall the need to clean them regularly. I usually did mine once a year, when I changed points and plugs. (I wonder how many people on this forum know what points are? :p )
 

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(I wonder how many people on this forum know what points are? :p )
Me. I do! (Unfortunately!) :rotfl:

If I only had a dollar for every set of points I've changed and/or adjusted over the years!
I'm so glad we don't have to mess with those things anymore.

But seriously I agree with you on your other points in the post. Personally I'm a little susupicious of Seafoam. Call me an old geezer, but I just can't see how pouring anything into your engine is a good thing. I would think that this stuff would be wiping the thin layer of oil off the cylinder wall and then burning it - which would account for all the "cool smoke" you see.

Not to mention all that stuff going through your cat. converter can't be good for it's longevity either!

Now, pouring it into the fuel tank is another thing. But sucking it in through the vacuum line - IDK! :undecided
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
This was a response from Seafoam to an email sent, found on another forum.

Sea Foam is an OIL PRODUCT, not a chemical, so do not worry about any secondary affects.

Have you used Sea Foam in your fuel?, Read the attachments for more information.

If your bikes engine began to create enough residue to "STICK" part of your valve train, IT IS TIME TO GET THAT OLD OIL OUT OF THERE!

Yes, the Sea Foam cleans the old deteriorated oil back to liquid, but your crankcase oil will quickly make more residue, your oil has reached the end of its SERVICEABLE LIFE!

Change your oil, read the attachment I have given on CRANKCASE OIL, treat the NEW oil with Sea Foam at 1 1/2 ounces per quart of oil capacity, then MONITOR YOUR OIL and change it when it gets dirty.

Oil is still cheaper than an engine!

Thanks for using Sea Foam!

Attachments with the reply:

Attachment 1:

Sea Foam Motor Treatment used in Crankcase Oil
All Gasoline and Diesel, Rotary style engines

Sea Foam Motor Treatment is a Blended Petroleum Product, NOT A CHEMICAL and is widely used as an old oil residue cleaner and moisture drier in any oil crankcase.

Sea Foam Motor Treatment is most commonly used as a pre service, old oil residue re-liquefier / cleaner and moisture drier, and is also used as an after service additive. Sea Foam Motor Treatment does NOT add significantly to oil volume, so removing oil is NOT required for use, when used according to printed directions on the product container.

1. As a PRE SERVICE CLEANER for old oil residue, (sticky rings or valve train noise), pour 1 ½ ounces of Sea Foam Motor Treatment into the engine oil crankcase for EACH quart of crankcase oil capacity including filter. (Diesels use 1 pint Sea Foam to 4 gallons of oil, please.) Drive a MINIMUM of 30 minutes/miles, MAXIMUM 100 miles, and then do your oil change service (LOF). This is the process of safely/slowly re liquefying the old oil residue so contaminants may flow and be filtered. This also makes your old oil dirtier, quickly, so a LOF service is necessary when the oil gets dirty. Great for Turbocharged & Supercharged applications where hot oils deteriorate so quickly due to heat, and leaves those residues that NEED CLEANING. (LOF = Lube oil & Filter service = OIL CHANGE).

2. As an AFTER SERVICE ADDITIVE into fresh oil, nearly fresh oil, or oil (used condition) that is NOT ready to be changed (by mileage), put 1 ½ ounces Sea Foam Motor Treatment into the crankcase per quart of capacity as described above, then SELF SET a program to MONITOR your oil for level, color and clarity on a mileage, timed, or event basis (like every time you add fuel, etc.) to determine when an oil service is necessary. (LOF) When the oil gets dirty, CHANGE IT!

Sea Foam Motor Treatment will safely and slowly re liquefy old oil residue, This will make your oil need changing BEFORE your normal scheduled LOF service. Only your monitoring of the oil for color and clarity can tell when it is time to do LOF - oil change service, or 3,000 miles, whichever comes first.

Synthetic oils, both blends and 100%, were engineered and are manufactured to be 100% compatible with petroleum based oils, all brands, and vice/versa. Without compatibility, oil manufacturers and engineers would be liable for the results of mixing non-compatible lubricants.

Check your oil; monitor its level, color & clarity to determine need for LOF service!
Change your oil when it gets dirty!

Technical Services Department May 2008 DD
Sea Foam Sales Company

Attachment 2:

Sea Foam Uses in Fuels

Sea Foam Motor Treatment #’s SF-16 (16 ounce), SF-128 (gallon container) and
SF-55 (a 55 gallon drum) is used as a fuel additive in Gasoline, Ethanol Blends, Gas/oil mixes & ALL Diesel fuels. This includes all brands and qualities of available fuels.

When added to these fuels, Sea Foam Motor Treatment was specifically designed to Safely do five (5) simple tasks for you. They are:

1. Sea Foam Motor Treatment is a 100% blended petroleum product. That means Sea Foam is OIL, so adding Sea Foam to ANY fuel, adds lubricity to Fuel systems, Induction systems (Including Drawn through Supercharged applications), upper cylinders, fuel pumps, and related fuel system & Exhaust (Turbocharged) components.
All fuels lack “Protecting” lubrication, Advantage: “Sea Foam”.

2. Sea Foam Motor Treatment contains an oil component that dries fuel system moisture. Moisture breaks down into its basic components of hydrogen and oxygen when Sea Foam Motor Treatment is added to any of the above listed fuels, allowing Sea Foam Motor Treatment to help eliminate problems caused by moisture, like diesel fuel gelling and poor run .Advantage: “Sea Foam”.

3. Sea Foam Motor Treatment contains an oil based high detergent fuel residue cleaner. Using Sea Foam Motor Treatment in your fuel system makes that old fuel residue safely back into liquid. Moisture becomes a “non issue” and allows contaminants to be filtered, as engineered by the manufacturer.
Advantage: “Sea Foam”.

4. Sea Foam Motor Treatments exclusive formula is blended specifically to clean carbon out of the engine as the engine is run. This is accomplished by our cleaning oil formula eliminating old sticky oil residue that holds carbon and allowing that carbon to flow out of the engine dust particle by dust particle. Advantage: “Sea Foam”.

5. Sea Foam Motor Treatment adds volatility to fuel and slows down the rate at which that fuel looses its ability to properly burn. When added to fuel and the fuel is in properly sealed containers or fuel systems, per printed container instructions, Sea Foam Motor Treatment is a fuel stabilizer for up to 2 years. Always run the engine for a long enough period of time to assure the entire system is protected.
Advantage: “Sea Foam”.

Technical Services Department
Sea Foam Sales Company

Updated May, 2008 DD

Last Attachment:

Sea Foam Amounts in Fuel

4 Cycle Type Engines
Diesel
Rotary (Wankel)
2 Cycle type Engines



Sea Foam Products recommends an average of 1 ounce Sea Foam Motor Treatment to each gallon of Gasoline (including 10% & 15% ethanol) and Diesel fuel (including low sulfur & Ultra Low Sulfur blends). With any vehicle or system FACTORY DESIGNED for E-85 fuel, use 2 ounces Sea foam per gallon of the fuel.


Parameters are: 1 – 16 ounce can of Sea Foam Motor Treatment to a MINIMUM of 8 gallons of fuel, Maximum 25 gallons fuel to a 16 ounce can for maintenance. Follow the instructions above for OIL INJECTED engines also. (NO Sea Foam Motor Treatment ever goes into the oil reserve tank for oil injection).


***For all gas/oil mixed fuels (2 cycle) and E-85 Ethanol to be used in systems NOT specifically factory designed for E-85 fuels, DOUBLE the amount of Sea Foam Motor Treatment used per gallon.


Sea Foam Motor Treatment is blended OIL, and will not run a gasoline, Gas/oil mix or Ethanol engine without introducing HYDROCARBONS (gasoline / ethanol) to the mixture at a minimum 50%.


Fuel injector cleaning machines in a controlled environment use Sea Foam Motor Treatment as their safe Cleaning agent mixed with gasoline or ethanol blend at a ratio of 50% Gasoline/Ethanol blend & 50% Sea Foam Motor Treatment.



Technical Services Department
Sea Foam Sales Company
Minneapolis, Minnesota
 

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We don't have to replace them, file them or adjust the point gap, change the condenser, adjust the valve lash or set the timing anymore. Spark plugs last 100,000 miles, not 10,000.

Motor (mineral) oil doesn't wear out; it gets contaminated with soot, water, acids, other combustion byproducts and metal particles. "Blended Petroleum Products" are chemicals by definition. Too much of a good thing can be bad and many petroleum product contents can be hazardous for engines. The gum and gunk deposits in engines came from the petroleum.
 

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We don't have to replace them, file them or adjust the point gap, change the condenser, adjust the valve lash or set the timing anymore. Spark plugs last 100,000 miles, not 10,000.

Motor (mineral) oil doesn't wear out; it gets contaminated with soot, water, acids, other combustion byproducts and metal particles. "Blended Petroleum Products" are chemicals by definition. Too much of a good thing can be bad and many petroleum product contents can be hazardous for engines. The gum and gunk deposits in engines came from the petroleum.

Have you file and cleaned yours recently, please tell me where they are? :x
 

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Have you file and cleaned yours recently, please tell me where they are? :x
The point set and condenser where on the breaker advance plate in the distributor, under the cap. The points were set using a feeler gauge if the distributor was in the engine. In a distributor machine (the distributor was removed from the engine) the points could be set by adjusting the "dwell". BTW there was a rotor that might need replacing, too. The distributor was located behind the carburetor toward the back of the block, above the camshaft that drove it. The straight 6 cylinder engines had the distributor mounted off to the side of the block and head. The early GM V-6 engines with coil packs and timing sensor on the crank still had the distributor-mounting hole. It was sealed with an O-ring and plate. It liked to leak oil when the O-ring hardened.
If you never worked on them you haven't missed anything.:D
 

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True. On GM V8, you could adjust the dwell with the distributor on the engine as well, thanks to the little window in the distributor and a small allen type wrench.
I always carried my dwell meter with me, anywhere I went. Can't tell you how many times I used it along the road - mostly on other people's cars.



I'm surprised they still sell points.


 

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i just replaced the points and condensor on my 1973 international scout II. right now it runs better than the tb. (just doesnt go as fast).
 
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