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2004 chevy trailblazer_ltz
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone
This is Carlos from South America calling for help
I would like to know if anyone has a recomendation for my 2004 I6 4.2 L TB motor oil SAE grade
Conditions in Venezuela are warmer than USA (minimum around 70 °F and maximum around 115 °F ) all along the whole year.
I had been looking for Mobil 1 5W-30 full syntetic motor oil, but it is pretty difficult to find, However Castrol 10W-30 is easy to get, I wonder what do you think about New Castrol 0W-40 syntetic blend?
My truck has already 70.000 Miles (95.000 Km) Is this Oil recommended in my case?
Can I use the new Castrol 0W-40 in my next oil change with no problem?

Thanks a lot to all of you

(Specially Mr. The Roadie if he has a good tip about this issue)

See you Friends !!

Carlocote from Caracas Venezuela...:tiphat
 

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2005 chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
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Wow - Roadie is even getting asked for!

Seriously, we have similar heat conditions here in the USA. We have this thing called the desert which includes a large amount of the south and western states.

GM along with others test their vehicles in Death Valley, where 120F is not uncommon.

I have a close friend who lives in Phoenix, AZ. In the summer months, 115 is about normal for the high, and around 100 for the low. I use GM recommended 5W-30 in my TB with no problems.

If you are really worried about the heat - use a synthetic 5W-30 oil, including (but not limited to) Mobil 1, Valvoline, or Pennzoil.

Oops, just saw you said it's hard to get Mobil 1. Many people like Castrol oil. Personally I've never been real impressed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Super 88

Good tip my friend, but you say nothing about the 0W-40?

Muchas Gracias Super 88
 

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being so far south-- those hot temps in Venezuela--- also include high humidity.
not sure how the high humidity would affect engine cooling...??? hmmmm
anyone know for sure?

but for humans--- who sweat- high humidity- means you sweat- but no cooling takes place because the sweat doesnt really dry off of you taking the heat with it... you simply sweat and overheat.

As for the oil... if you cant find the 5w-30 in synthetic--- I personally wouldnt go with something thats not mentioned in the manual...
meaning- id stick with regular 5w-30 dino.
 

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isnt the 0w rated for colder temps?

i.e. 10w30 rated for over 0-150 and 5w30 rated from -30to 130 or something along those lines?
 

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I would NOT use 0W-40. In your climate, you are not getting any benifit of the 0W rating and 40 weight is too heavy. Stick with a decent 5W-30 even if it isn't synthetic. At your temperatures, 10W-30 is also acceptable.

being so far south-- those hot temps in Venezuela--- also include high humidity.
not sure how the high humidity would affect engine cooling...??? hmmmm
anyone know for sure?
For engine cooling, humidity is a good thing. Higher humidity translates to higher density. That means more mass to absorb heat as the air passes through the radiator.

Joe
 

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Good tip my friend, but you say nothing about the 0W-40?

Muchas Gracias Super 88
I didn't say anything about OW-40 because I've never used it. Personally I wouldn't use it and would stick to what the manufacturer recommends - in this case 5W-30.
I tend to think that the company that designed and built the vehicle knows a little more about it than I do.
 

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Stick with a 30w oil. If you have Castrol available you should be able to find a 5W-30 in either the Syntec or Syntec blend, if not their new Castrol edge.
This 0W40 is a stout 40w, and if it is shear stable, it will stay there.
 

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I agree with the 0-40. I would stay away from it. Personally I would have no problem using 10-30 conventional oil. I always use it in the summer in my vehicles. The manual says to use 5-30 under normal circumstances. That is fine, but that is so common people don't have to make the decision themselves. They'd have people dumping in all sorts of oil and have more warranty claims. I use 5-30 in the cooler months, 10-30 in the summer. Just make sure you drive easy while your truck is warming up. You want to give the oil a chance to warm up and get up in the motor. Also, I'm a valvoline guy, but Castrol is a decent oil. You shouldn't have any problems with it.:thumbsup:
 

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Why change? They are both 30W when hot.
Technically that is true, but the base oil is different and when/if it heats up and begins to break down under severe conditions the viscosity is different.
That actually brings up a good point to a question I've never had answered. If that is the case, why it is your oil is heavier when cold and thin when hot, yet it's supposed to be visa versa?:undecided
 

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Technically that is true, but the base oil is different and when/if it heats up and begins to break down under severe conditions the viscosity is different.
That actually brings up a good point to a question I've never had answered. If that is the case, why it is your oil is heavier when cold and thin when hot, yet it's supposed to be visa versa?:undecided
Before the SM oils, the oils may shear down to a little. But I have yet to see any proof that this happens with just about any SM oil.

Even so I have never seen any engine failures coming from the oil shearing. Most engines failures are from abuse or neglect.

It's not "technically" true, it is true. When GM and others test their vehicles in Death Valley with 120F ambient temps - do you think they change to 10W-30 for the tests and then change back to something else when the temp. drops?

I have vehicles and have seen others go many hundreds of thousands of miles with 5W-30. I have one now that is over 200K miles. It doesn't use oil, the engine is quiet, gets the same MPG as when it was new, and passes Ca. smog tests with flying colors.

Yes I live in San Diego where MOSTLY the temps are mild, but I OFTEN drive to various surrounding areas where the temps are 100 - 115 consistently.
One of my frequent trips is to haul 6 people over to Las Vegas or Laughlin area in the summer with the above mentioned temps. One place has a very long hill several miles long and very steep.
Another trip I've frequently made is crossing the Grapevine - north of L.A. Very steep and very long and while not quite as high of temps, still gets very hot in the summer time.

I'm not saying there is anything wrong with 10W-30 (other than it is basically obsolete) but thinking it "protects" the engine better is just not true.
 

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The 5W versus 10W, while different is really minimal. Even today's oils do shear down, and you will have a hard time knowing what type of additive package an oil manufacturer has used to help minimize that. Does going synthetic help to combat that? You would think it would, but not all is what it seems.
 

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Before the SM oils, the oils may shear down to a little. But I have yet to see any proof that this happens with just about any SM oil.

Even so I have never seen any engine failures coming from the oil shearing. Most engines failures are from abuse or neglect.

It's not "technically" true, it is true. When GM and others test their vehicles in Death Valley with 120F ambient temps - do you think they change to 10W-30 for the tests and then change back to something else when the temp. drops?

I have vehicles and have seen others go many hundreds of thousands of miles with 5W-30. I have one now that is over 200K miles. It doesn't use oil, the engine is quiet, gets the same MPG as when it was new, and passes Ca. smog tests with flying colors.

Yes I live in San Diego where MOSTLY the temps are mild, but I OFTEN drive to various surrounding areas where the temps are 100 - 115 consistently.
One of my frequent trips is to haul 6 people over to Las Vegas or Laughlin area in the summer with the above mentioned temps. One place has a very long hill several miles long and very steep.
Another trip I've frequently made is crossing the Grapevine - north of L.A. Very steep and very long and while not quite as high of temps, still gets very hot in the summer time.

I'm not saying there is anything wrong with 10W-30 (other than it is basically obsolete) but thinking it "protects" the engine better is just not true.
I did a little research to support my method. I also found one to support yours in the same article. So "technically" we are both right:thumbsup:

Is there a disadvantage to using an oil that flows better when cold, i.e. 5W30 versus 10W30?
Sometimes, but usually not. The crux of the issue is this: the bigger the difference between the cold oil viscosity and the hot oil viscosity, the more the volume of viscosity modifiers and the less the volume of base stock. If you are good about following the manufacturer's recommended oil change interval then stick with the 5W30 if that is the preferred oil for your vehicle, even if 10W30 is acceptable in warmer climates. Older cars may specify 10W30 only. This is because they need a little more viscosity when cold to keep a protective film on the cylinder walls. There have been instances where the larger amount of viscosity modifiers that are present in 5W30 have broken down due to excessive heat and have left carbon deposits on the valves, but this is extremely rare. The proper fix would be to reduce the excessive heat, but the workaround was to use an oil with less viscosity modifiers.

And yours:

Thicker is Better Myth
The reason that oil viscosities have gotten thinner is because bearing clearances have become smaller. Using thicker oils will interfere with oil flow and the oil pressure will increase. In a worn engine it may be okay to increase the viscosity of the oil because the bearing clearances have become larger.

Interesting information.:undecided
 

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I did a little research to support my method. I also found one to support yours in the same article. So "technically" we are both right:thumbsup:

Is there a disadvantage to using an oil that flows better when cold, i.e. 5W30 versus 10W30?
Sometimes, but usually not. The crux of the issue is this: the bigger the difference between the cold oil viscosity and the hot oil viscosity, the more the volume of viscosity modifiers and the less the volume of base stock. If you are good about following the manufacturer's recommended oil change interval then stick with the 5W30 if that is the preferred oil for your vehicle, even if 10W30 is acceptable in warmer climates. Older cars may specify 10W30 only. This is because they need a little more viscosity when cold to keep a protective film on the cylinder walls. There have been instances where the larger amount of viscosity modifiers that are present in 5W30 have broken down due to excessive heat and have left carbon deposits on the valves, but this is extremely rare. The proper fix would be to reduce the excessive heat, but the workaround was to use an oil with less viscosity modifiers.

And yours:

Thicker is Better Myth
The reason that oil viscosities have gotten thinner is because bearing clearances have become smaller. Using thicker oils will interfere with oil flow and the oil pressure will increase. In a worn engine it may be okay to increase the viscosity of the oil because the bearing clearances have become larger.

Interesting information.:undecided
Interesting yes and while I don't disagree, but you failed to give a link or say where you got this information from. Also are they talking about modern SM rated oil, or previous oils? There is a difference. I've read a lot of UOAs and most of the time the modern 5W-30 oil stays in grade.

The thing I find interesting is that people like to say "Well 5W-30 will shear down after time to a 5W-20". That in some cases is true.
BUT - many people have ran their cars for hundreds of thousands of miles on these "sheared down" oils. As many of you probably know, a lot of manufacturers now recommended (SM) 5W-20 oil to start with - some Fords, Toyota, Honda and Chrysler.

But getting back to the point - I still don't think there is any real benefit to use 10W-30 oil. Maybe IF the engine is worn enough that it is leaking and/or burning oil, okay.
But not in a normal operating engine.
I have seen cases where at operating temps, some 5W-30 will actually be "thicker" than some 10W-30 oils.

I'm not saying you will destroy your engine by using 10W-30 either. Many people will probably not notice the difference one way or another.
 

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Castrol Syntec Blend Truck & SUV (15W 40 & 20W 50)

Hi all

Im from Venezuela too, and here you can find Castrol Syntec Blend Truck & SUV 15W 40 and 20W 50. I have a TB LTZ 4.2L , 2002 with 105.000 Km.

What´s the Castrol Syntec Blend Truck & SUV 15W 40 and 20W 50 diferences ?

Which of them can I use for my TB with 105k kilometers ??

And

How long kilometers can i take for make the oil service ??

Thanks

Adrian
 

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I Would Use Mobil 1 5w-30 Truck & SUV

Hello; I am surprised that no one recommended the Mobil 1 Truck & SUV 5w-30 Motor Oil. I would NEVER use any other kind of full synthetic. Mobil 1 comes factory filled with the "SS" trailblazers. You say that M1 is hard to get. Well do you have any car stores around you? like car quest, autozone, o reilly's? if they do not stock M1 truck and suv; you can have them order it for you and you can pick it up in their store. did you try walmart? usually they have a great stock full. Ebay also a possibility (sometimes you can get great deals on the oil). As for an oil filter i would recommend a Mobil 1 oil filter also.
Thats what i use in my trailblazer never any problems at all. I use the oil life system and usually comes on around 9-10k. Visit www.mobiloil.com for more information on Mobil 1 & why i agree that it is the only way to go. Also i agree that you should not use 10w-30 or 10w-40 or any other viscosity / weight; Its just way to heavy on these engines and they are not designed for it. Look in your owners manual it says it right in there that you should only use 5w-30 and to use the Oil Life Monitor. That's my :m2: Good Luck. Ed.
 

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It will say in your owners manual. For the 2003, it says to stay away from the 20w-50 and the 10w-40. The 10w-30 is fine if you can't find the 5w-30. There was an episode on Motorweek, on the Gosse's Garage segment. They had a tech from an oil company ( can't remember which). His explanation about the oil thickening at higher temps was along the lines of a type of wax molecules added to the oil. As the oil heats-up, the molecules bind together to increase the viscosity.
 
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