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2006 chevy trailblazer_ls
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1 Posts
2006 trailblazer w/ stabilitrak

thank you for doing this Write up.
Some notes for my truck.
not sure why possibly Wheel speed sensor sleeve on the axle but moving the axles in and out took a lot of force. Prying and pounding. my axles have that sleeve that rotates with the axle for the Sensor to pick up. I think that that is really where most of the resistance was coming from for us.

I would also suggest making sure that you can remove your fill inspection plug prior to draining the differential. Mine ended up being stuck and eventually stripped. So I had to drill the cover and put a rubber differential fill plug in at the same line as the OEM plug. That's in the differential housing. Three-quarter inch hole and the doorman product number 65293. if anybody else wants to do that. Instead of having someone extract the frozen Fill inspection plug.

for bearing removal I did have to rent A rear axle bearing PULLER from "the zone." 55 bucks and their slide hammer for 45 bucks.

And bought a bearing installer from hf tools. Worked great for bearing and seal installation.

Hope this helps.
 

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2005 saab 9_7x
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13 Posts
First up, thank you for the post, certainly was helpful as I do the rear bearings/seals on my 05 Saab 9-7x 4.2i with around 98k on it.

One thing I have noticed throughout the web is that everyone seems to be able to just slide their axles back in with little to no resistance after the new bearing and seals are installed.

The C clips are not on the axles as I am re-installing them but once I get up to the machined area of the axle, it get's very snug to the point of having to break out a block of wood and hammer on the axle to get it all the way in.

The replacement torrington bearings matched the old ones visually, confirmed part numbers etc etc, everything matched up fine. I even took the spider gears out and put them on the axles to ensure things were not getting gummed up, they were not, so I am wondering now if the new bearings have some thousandth of an inch on them causing the friction. Once they are in, you have to use a slide hammer to get them back out after the C clip is reinstalled.

Anyone else experience this type of friction/resistance? I did reapply gear lube to the bearing before re-inserting the shaft.
 

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2003 gmc envoy_slt
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56 Posts
axle bearing removal tool - wtf?

thanks for all the instructions and photos in the first post. really helped to understand what i was getting into. took me about 10 hours to replace seals and bearings on both sides (but this also includes diff oil service and replacing rotors, pads, e-brake pads).

an observation with the rental tool i got from advance auto. the bearing removal attachment (looks like a pivoting shoe that fits behind the bearing race) in the kit was either too small (smaller than the race OD - 2.625") or too large (shoe was cocked in the axle tube bore, with only one end making contact with the bearing race).

i was able to use the larger size attachment, but it really beat the [email protected] out of the inside diameter of the axle tube (lots of gouges - looks and feels bad). this was because the tool was not perpendicular to the back side of the bearing. although it did do the job, the bearings came out with LOTS of pounding. there must be a better fitting attachment out there somewhere??? i cannot believe that this is "normal".
 

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2003 gmc envoy_slt
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628 Posts
an observation with the rental tool i got from advance auto. the bearing removal attachment (looks like a pivoting shoe that fits behind the bearing race) in the kit was either too small (smaller than the race OD - 2.625") or too large (shoe was cocked in the axle tube bore, with only one end making contact with the bearing race).

i was able to use the larger size attachment, but it really beat the [email protected] out of the inside diameter of the axle tube (lots of gouges - looks and feels bad). this was because the tool was not perpendicular to the back side of the bearing. although it did do the job, the bearings came out with LOTS of pounding. there must be a better fitting attachment out there somewhere??? i cannot believe that this is "normal".
I tried those bearing pullers and had the same problems. I now just use a long pipe. I remove both axles, usually you're doing both seals or both bearings anyways. I slip the pipe in one side, tilt it up and whack it with a hammer a couple of times. I now tilt is down and repeat, then repeat again until the bearing falls out. Simple, cheap and it works for every size bearing. I had planned on making a Youtube video but never got around to it.

The diameter that I'm using is .88" thick wall tubing. It has worked on all makes and sizes of bearings. It really works slick and I've never had to hammer more than a half minute at most. In some cases it helped to have a helper "aim" the end of the tubing so it would catch the bearing as the tubing as not flexible enough to droop down. I don't know the length but it needs to span the rear end with enough sticking out the one side to comfortably hammer on. Make sure you are using a new clean pipe, not some old rusted piece that you dug up from the back yard!
 
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