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2007 chevy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2WD vs AWD. I have a boat ramp that is first partconcrete, second half gravel. Does the 2wd model have posi or limited slip, or is the Awd model the best way to go for all conditions?

Also, It appears that all TB's have a hitch, yet some models list a towing package. How does this differ?

Thanks.
 

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2004 gmc
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You haven't bought a vehicle yet, right? All models have an available G80 option (check the glove box sticker) that is an automatic locking rear diff. Not a limited slip. If one wheel starts to slip and spin, the other will lock and make sure you get moving. The AWD models (Bravada, Rainier) have a slip detector from front to back, similar to the A4WD mode of the Trailblazer and Envoy 4WD models. But without the G80, even a 4WD vehicle can sit there on a slippery surface with one rear tire spinning, and they go nowhere.

I don't think there is a trailvoy model that doesn't have a tow setup as standard equipment. A small transmission cooler is built into the radiator, but many owners add an aftermarket external one.
 

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2003 chevy trailblazer_lt_ext
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GMT360s have always been delivered with a Class III hitch, in-radiator trans cooler, and brake controller wiring. In other words, most of what usually constitutes a "towing package". Someone can correct me if I'm wrong about the year, but I think up until 2005 a "towing package" simply meant the addition of a seven prong connector. For some reason GM didn't see fit to make it standard. After that year, it was standard.
 

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You haven't bought a vehicle yet, right? All models have an available G80 option (check the glove box sticker) that is an automatic locking rear diff. Not a limited slip. If one wheel starts to slip and spin, the other will lock and make sure you get moving. The AWD models (Bravada, Rainier) have a slip detector from front to back, similar to the A4WD mode of the Trailblazer and Envoy 4WD models. But without the G80, even a 4WD vehicle can sit there on a slippery surface with one rear tire spinning, and they go nowhere.

I don't think there is a trailvoy model that doesn't have a tow setup as standard equipment. A small transmission cooler is built into the radiator, but many owners add an aftermarket external one.
So would that mean that a Towing Package will include the G80 option, a tranny cooler, and trailer wiring? I havent purchased one yet so Im getting the info now. I have heard of owners installing a aftermarket trans cooler, but did they come with an external cooler as an option?

gmt360s have always been delivered with a class iii hitch, in-radiator trans cooler, and brake controller wiring. In other words, most of what usually constitutes a "towing package". Someone can correct me if i'm wrong about the year, but i think up until 2005 a "towing package" simply meant the addition of a seven prong connector. For some reason gm didn't see fit to make it standard. After that year, it was standard.
gmt360?
 

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So would that mean that a Towing Package will include the G80 option, a tranny cooler, and trailer wiring? I havent purchased one yet so Im getting the info now. I have heard of owners installing a aftermarket trans cooler, but did they come with an external cooler as an option?
No. The G80 option is a separate and distinct option, but very desirable for snow, ice, offroading, and slippery trailering. A radiator-based tranny cooler is standard, and GM didn't offer an external cooler as an option on trailvoys. Cheap and easy to do for the owner, though. Trailer wiring is standard, but the only option MIGHT be the 7-pin receptacle near the hitch. Some vehicles come with a socket that you have to plug in an adapter to make it all work. If you're looking at vehicles, just look at the hitch area and see if it has a receptacle with a flap door cover. (6 flat blades surrounding a round hole). None of the vehicles has an electric brake controller built-in, but if you need one, the four wires you need to install one are coiled up near the driver's left foot.

Also a consideration is the gear ratio. If you're going to trailer a heavy unit for a lot of your vehicle's life, the 4.10 gear ratio is the most desirable, but rare to find. 3.73 is a good compromise. 3.42 is the best for economy, but not as desirable for towing. There were only three choices on trailvoys.

GMT360 is the GM internal designation for our platform (Chevy, GMC, Olds, Saab, Buick, Isuzu all had versions), although the long wheelbase versions are GMT370. We use it as shorthand a lot so we don't have to say Chevy Trailblazer/GMC Envoy/ Buick Rainier/ Olds Bravada/Saab 9-7X/Isuzu Ascender

For more reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_GMT_platform
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No. The G80 option is a separate and distinct option, but very desirable for snow, ice, offroading, and slippery trailering. A radiator-based tranny cooler is standard, and GM didn't offer an external cooper as an option on trailvoys. Cheap and easy to do for the owner, though. Trailer wiring is standard, but the only option MIGHT be the 7-pin receptacle near the hitch. Some vehicles come with a socket that you have to plug in an adapter to make it all work. If you're looking at vehicles, just look at the hitch area and see if it has a receptacle with a flap door cover. (6 flat blades surrounding a round hole). None of the vehicles has an electric brake controller built-in, but if you need one, the four wires you need to install one are coiled up near the driver's left foot.

Also a consideration is the gear ratio. If you're going to trailer a heavy unit for a lot of your vehicle's life, the 4.10 gear ratio is the most desirable, but rare to find. 3.73 is a good compromise. 3.42 is the best for economy, but not as desirable for towing. There were only three choices on trailvoys.
Cool, thanks for the info. Ya know whats funny is the other day when I test drove a 2wd SS, the trailer plug near the hitch was mounted behind the small hatched panel left of the hitch. The tolerance was so tight that I didnt see a way to plug in anything unless you removed that hatched panel or it hinged out some way. Am I missing something?:duh:
 

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I actually just pulled my 7prong loose and zip-tied it to the mounting bracket on our SS. Meant lengthening my trailer harnesses, but made connections easier...also made it possible to add the four-prong plug in adapter when I wasn't using trailer brakes.

Any 2wd SS will have everything you need to tow...no experience with AWD SS versions, so I won't go there. I would suggest adding a brake controller with any Trailblazer that you are towing with...it is just good insurance. The wiring harness is above the driver dash closeout panel above the pedal assembly...very easy to do.

The SS WILL tow all the way up to its limit and never give you any trouble! I never exceed capapcity, but got close a few times. The truck is not as good as a full size truck as far as towability goes, but it does a very acceptable job.
 

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My TBSS is AWD and it tows up to and I expect easily beyond the stated GCVW, but I have a 1979 3/4 ton for that kind of abuse. The TBSS starts and stops better than my truck but it doesn't have the same level of stability due to its smaller dimensions and weight.
 

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I don't think there is a trailvoy model that doesn't have a tow setup as standard equipment. A small transmission cooler is built into the radiator, but many owners add an aftermarket external one.
 

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2006 chevy trailblazer_ss_3ss
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SS is different and I have no experience with it. Its mission is not towing. :yes:
Actually, the SS is a GREAT tow rig. Granted, the short wheel means a large enclosed trailer would be difficult to tow... But the LS2's low end grunt and the low geared rear end allows it to be a better puller than my dad's Denali, and worlds better than my '95 Yukon. :m2:
 
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