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Discussion Starter #1
Pulling my trans on my 03 trailblazer 4x4. I can’t get the cross member out, on the passenger side, by the fuel tank there is a black box that keeps me from removing one of the through bolts on the crossmember. The bolt is too long to pull out with that black box in the way. I can’t figure out how to remove it. No visible bolts and it seems solid in place. I don’t know what it’s called so I can’t google how to remove it. Please see attached video.
 

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2004 GMC Envoy SLT 4.2
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231 Posts
I don't know what that box is either .
It looks like maybe it has a lid with hinges that might be able to be opened . With the lid out of the way , there might be enough room for that bolt to come out .
Good luck . ::)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I got it. The plastic clips required extreme prying with a screwdriver and a wonder bar. Took all I had. Mileage is 135k. Trans shop said it’s burnt clutches and a band. I’m taking the trans out, having them rebuild it and then I’m reinstalling it.
 

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2008 gmc envoy_sle
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629 Posts
135K miles OR 216K KM's

not great, should have lasted longer.
whats the cost of the rebuild. and total time to remove the trans would be helpful to others who have the same issue.
 

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2004 gmc envoy_slt_xl
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69 Posts
Make sure you add another trans cooler, heat is what kills the 4l60. With an additional cooler it will last a lot longer.
 

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If you go that^ , be sure you hook that cooler up in the right place .
You have to put the auxiliary cooler BEFORE the radiator heat exchanger. Coolingbtge ATF before it adds a lot of heat to the engine coolant is the correct policy.

The ATF has to run at about 200°F to allow the plasticizers in the fluid to keep the neoprene and other rubber seals pliant and flexible.

Do NOT OVERCOOL THE ATF by taking the radiator heat exchanger completely out of the circuit either.
Overheating the engine is a primary concern, true... but keeping the transmission at the correct (not too hot, not too cold) temperature is just as important.

Your engine coolant is held at 195°F and so should your transmission be too. Premature transmission failures were one of the biggest reasons why I had all the work in my shops..... caused by overcooling.... not so much by overheating.

Transmissions overheat because they cannot get into TCC, because the transmission itself generates very little heat. The convertor is the giant heat maker! Going into TCC is not just a fuel economy design..... some units will force TCC early if it gets hotter than designed values.
 
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