Chevy TrailBlazer, TrailBlazer SS and GMC Envoy Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ran to the store last night, all was well. Then SES light popped right as I turned off engine. Drive home less than 1 mile, plugged in Code reader and it shows P1200 and C0015. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
Well... C0015 is as follows from a Google Search...
C0015 Description The Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS) Module monitors the Right Front Outlet Solenoid. The ABS Module sets the OBDII code when the Right Front Outlet Solenoid is not to factory specifications.

And the P1200 is as follows.....
P1200 CHEVROLET Meaning - While the engine is running, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) detects an incorrect voltage level on one or more injector driver circuits for more than 5 seconds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
translated to plain English - I’m new to this please bear with me. I have an ABS solenoid right front that is bad and one or more injector driver circuits has the wrong voltage. If I had plug wires I would change those out for the second problem, but the TB has coils which are fairly spendy. I will do some research and see how I can check those and probably throw in new spark plugs while I’m at it. Thank you for your response. The first issue will also require some research.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
IIRC... you'll find that the ABS Solenoids are in a hydraulic/electrical hybrid module and unless GM has pulled a fast one... they are not separately serviceable. It's usually all or nothing.

If you have a meter that is sensitive enough, you might be able to isolate a COP Unit that is out of "normal" range for resistance. Just compare all of them individually with each other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
IIRC... you'll find that the ABS Solenoids are in a hydraulic/electrical hybrid module and unless GM has pulled a fast one... they are not separately serviceable. It's usually all or nothing.

If you have a meter that is sensitive enough, you might be able to isolate a COP Unit that is out of "normal" range for resistance. Just compare all of them individually with each other.
Ok thanks so much! You saved me some research time. Much appreciated!
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top