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2002 chevy trailblazer_ltz
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9 Posts
Indicator lights

Does anyone that has done this remember if the indicator lights came on or not prior to the fix?
 

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2007 chevy trailblazer_lt
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8 Posts
I did this last night. Had no heat coming out of the bottom, just the back. The switch worked normally. First I'd like to clarify for anyone out there like me that has a 2007 Trailblazer. This seat heater DOES work in this year TB. I can't speak for any other year, but I'd comfortably assume this model will work with years 02-09. ((Part number 641107))

The model number from the one I pulled out of my '07 WAS different than this. (603062 GM Part# on it) but the pads themselves and the connectors looked identical. I did hear that Doorman has upgraded the wire that burns out on the originals, to prevent another failure like this. Not sure if that's true or not but just thought i'd add that.

Now as for the actual replacement procedure. First off I took the whole seat out, its fast and easy only 2 connectors that are easy to see and remove. I did remove my leather cover a bit differently than the OP. I removed the 4 hog rings on the right side of the seat, and then 2 in the middle. This way all 6 hog rings I needed to rebend where in very easy to access spots. You can clearly see them all. It also gives you the ability to peel the whole cover off the seat just about and very easily put the new pad in to place.
I didn't remove the old Hog clips, just unbent them with 2 needle nose pliers, re-bent to re-install later.

Overall this was a 2 out of 10 on the difficulty scale imo. It took 2 hours and that was with me cleaning up my work spaces AND in the dark with a flashlight AND in the WI Winter weather lol! So needles to say, just do it. It's a quick job, it's not hard at all, and my ass is nice and toasty!

Here are some pictures of the 2 pads next to each other, and the point of failure.
 

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2002 gmc envoy_slt
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1 Posts
I did mine a couple of weeks ago on an 02 Envoy SLT. This forum made all the difference. I got the new seat heater in without any issues. I will say I threw out the three hog rings that I removed and replaced them with small zip ties. I just had to pre-curl them a little to get them under the dowel.

When I got everything back together it still didn't work. I read the replies and saw the forum about the broken circuit in the module. I took the module out, soldered the circuit, and then reinstalled everything. Works great now!

Replaced the 2 front wheel hub/bearings last week, the thermostat the week before, next is the motor mounts and then some suspension parts (sway bar ends?). The truck still looks great, but with 194,000 mi, it needs some attention.
 

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2005 chevy trailblazer_lt_ext
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21 Posts
I did mine a couple of weeks ago on an 02 Envoy SLT. This forum made all the difference. I got the new seat heater in without any issues. I will say I threw out the three hog rings that I removed and replaced them with small zip ties. I just had to pre-curl them a little to get them under the dowel.

When I got everything back together it still didn't work. I read the replies and saw the forum about the broken circuit in the module. I took the module out, soldered the circuit, and then reinstalled everything. Works great now!

Replaced the 2 front wheel hub/bearings last week, the thermostat the week before, next is the motor mounts and then some suspension parts (sway bar ends?). The truck still looks great, but with 194,000 mi, it needs some attention.
I bought mine last year with 180,000 and the suspension was shot.

I did the following and it pretty much rides like new:
 

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2006 chevy trailblazer_lt_ext
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6 Posts
2006 lt ext

The how to was great. Thanks.
I just installed the Dorman 641-107 in my 2006 LT EXT & my dads 2006 Saab 9-7x drivers seat. I am still waiting on 2 more heating pads to fix my sisters 2006 Saab 9-7x drivers and passenger seat.
I removed the 4 hog clips on the side, and then 2 in the middle.
First seat took me 3 hours, next seat took me 2 hours.
The dorman warmer gets so much hotter then the stock heating element.
 

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2004 gmc envoy_slt
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11 Posts
Responding here primarily so I don't lose the thread but this looks great. I just signed papers on a 2004 Envoy SLT yesterday that has this problem in the drivers seat.

I've found the Dorman part here 2002-2004 GMC Envoy Seat Heater Pad 4173-05081450 from partsgeek.com for about $72. The GM autoparts replacement is now up to $145 :(

I may actually shoot video clips of doing this to further enhance the thread. If I do I will certainly post a link to it here :thumbsup:
 

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2004 gmc envoy_slt_xuv
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1 Posts
I know this is an old thread but it's A major help still. I did the Dorman element and the pliers are really poor quality. I cut all the metal off above the groove with bolt cutters and cleaned it with a grinder so I could set the hog ring in the groove. With the tip protruding a bit past the end it could be stuck through the holes. Align and squeeze is all it took after that. Thanks for all the help everyone, happy thanksgiving.
 

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2003 chevy trailblazer_ltz
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210 Posts
The Dorman replacement unit is unfortunately made in Communist China
The original passenger seat cushion heater failed last summer, (It still "works", but produces a hateful hot-spot mid-thigh) The driver's side--replaced in March 2011 with the Dorman heater--also failed completely again.

I get to do the passenger side in the next week or so. I did the driver's seat this afternoon. The original photos in this thread from post #1 have expired due to Damned Photobucket, so here's my photos. Vehicle is a 2003 Trailblazer LTZ, 4.2L, not an extended version.

Best price I found for a Dorman 641-107 is Amazon. NAPA wants $188 for the thing, which is insane--although the "Limited Lifetime" warranty helps. https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NDP7454003
Summit wants $119, which is bad enough. https://www.summitracing.com/parts/RNB-641-107/
Amazon is asking $75. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001KQA9ZE/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

First off, I disconnected the battery to prevent any possible air-bag explosions, and then I tested the new seat heater with an ohmmeter. It reads 3.5--3.6 ohms at the green connector. The broken seat heater will read "Open" or "OL", Out-of-Limit (depending on your meter) for that range on the ohmmeter because the internal heating element will be burnt-through at the "pleat" where the upholstery is secured by the hog-rings. There were some times I could get an ohmmeter reading of the old, burnt heater, but they were in the 10-ohm range, not three-and-a-half ohms like the new one.


The side-panel that holds the seat adjustment switches is also broken on my Trailblazer, and will be replaced as part of this operation. That's why my seat-adjustment switches are just dangling from the wiring in some of my photos.

The seat cushion can be EASILY unbolted from the rest of the seat assembly. Two 13mm nuts near the front edge of the seat, two 13mm nuts accessed from the rear, near the rear edge of the seat. Disconnect FOUR electrical connectors, pull the seat out (with the seat-panel assembly that includes the seat adjustment switches.) Other model years may have additional wiring connectors--I don't know.

The rest of the seat assembly stays in the vehicle. DON'T unbolt it from the floor. Raise the seat using the adjustment switches, for access to the four nuts, and the electrical connectors. I put it in the middle of the fore-aft travel, but I don't think that's critical. This is a really good time to vacuum under and around the seat. I blew fuzz and crap out of there using compressed air. Found one dime and one nickel. Believe me, this job is worth more than fifteen cents.


I lifted the rear of the seat bottom from the seat assembly, and started to disconnect the electrical connectors. First electrical connector is a thin two-wire deal attached to the seat belt


Right next to it is a bigger multi-wire connector.


Those two connectors plug to the mating connectors near each other. These are the matching connectors on the seat cushion.


Only one plug is disconnected from the electronics "box" under the seat cushion. Easy to get at either from underneath, or with the seat cushion lifted up for access.


And the wire/connector that stays with the seat assembly


The final connector on the seat cushion, easy to get at from underneath.


...And it's mate that stays with the seat assembly, at the front edge of the seat assembly.


With the electrical connectors undone, the cushion can be fully removed. Somewhere in here you'll need to remove the three screws that hold the seat-adjustment switch panel--but mine's already broken off. Flip the cushion over, there are 6 upholstery clips and a bit of Velcro to undo. First two clips on the cushion sides:


Third clip, along the outer side by the seat adjuster switches:


Fourth, along the inner side:


Fifth, at the cushion front (or rear, I forget.)


And a spot of Velcro


Sixth, and last because the others need to be released and the foam flipped-up to get at this one. Seat cushion rear (or front, I forget.)


This gets us to those hateful hog-rings, and where the harsh language commences. Remove the upholstery from the hog-rings in six places (circled in red). Work from left to right as pictured, lower edge, then undo the two higher up. The seat heater is visible. Note the burned section. The seat heater is held to the foam with sticky-tape, and it'll peel some foam up as it's pulled loose. At this point, you'll disconnect the green connector to get the old heater separated from the rest of the seat-cushion wiring. Note how the seat-heater wire and connector is secured to the seat cushion frame. (not pictured)


The old seat heater removed. Obvious scorched area--common as dirt. They all seem to fail in the same place.


At this point, shove the new heater in place where the old one was, re-connect the hog rings in reverse order (replace if needed--I re-used all but one.) Stretch the upholstery back over the foam, tucking the foam nicely and neatly to remove wrinkles from the upholstery. Replace all the plastic upholstery clips onto the cushion frame, starting with the last one and going "backwards". Push the green connector together and secure it to the cushion frame.

Drop the seat cushion back onto the seat assembly, leaving space to re-connect all the wiring. With the wiring handled, the studs on the cushion frame drop through the holes in the seat assembly. You tighten four nuts...and test the seat heater.

Mine is nice 'n' toasty, with no hateful "hot-spot" mid-thigh. Success. Drink much beer in celebration.
 

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2003 chevy trailblazer_ltz
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Chevy Trailblazer 2008 LTZ (4.2L)
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218 Posts
Hi guys, I just wanted to add some new photos, since I'm going to replace the heated seats soon.
01.JPG


02.JPG


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04.JPG


05.JPG


06.JPG

Tester Wire Resistance

07.JPG

Resistance to new heating.
 
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