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2005 chevy trailblazer_ls
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm undecided. I need your off-road advice on a set of tires. The 3 tires I had in mind (les schwab brands), Toyo Open country M/T (had em before, expensive but nice), **** Cepek Mountain Cat E/T (also had before and liked, but seem knock-off ish because they aren't **** Cepek's, just a design by him?), or Maxxis Big Horn (reveiws are pretty good but classed as an A/T????? they look more like M/T's to me). Please help! I hate buyers remorse! hahaha!

oh and if this helps sizing goes

Toyos 33 x 12.5
Maxxis 33 x 11
Mountain Cat 32 x 11

:thx
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
p.s. most of my off-road driving will be mainly dirt/gravel trails, snow, and the occasional muddy ruts. no big rocks really in Idaho. so i want a tire that would be best suited for these conditions. anyone have opinions?
 

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i've got maxxis bighorn m/t 265/75 on my 02 right now. they have proven pretty good so far. only problem is i had to do some cutting even after the 2.5" in the front, and have more to do. just judging from your gallery, you may want to invest in your lift, spacers/rims beforehand:m2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i've got maxxis bighorn m/t 265/75 on my 02 right now. they have proven pretty good so far. only problem is i had to do some cutting even after the 2.5" in the front, and have more to do. just judging from your gallery, you may want to invest in your lift, spacers/rims beforehand:m2:
just got done with the front lift today. getting the z71 rear shock/spring and blocks put in tomorrow. and have 1.5 in wheel adapters. i have the clearance i need to fit em. I just would like to know an off-roader's opinion on which one has the best value price and quality wise.
 

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it all depends on what kind of offroading your doing

bfg m/t km2's-mud
bfg m/t - rock
bfg a/t- road with some offroading, light on mud ok with rocks

everybody please add to this list...
 

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2006 gmc envoy_denali_xl
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it all depends on what kind of offroading your doing

bfg m/t km2's-mud
bfg m/t - rock
bfg a/t- road with some offroading, light on mud ok with rocks

everybody please add to this list...
Slicks - drag racing!!!!!!:woohoo::woohoo::woohoo:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You should buy my bfgs in for sale section for cheap...
was thinking about getting these exact ones on tirerack, but they too narrow a tire for the wheels i'm getting. i need and want at least an 11in wide tire.

it all depends on what kind of offroading your doing

bfg m/t km2's-mud
bfg m/t - rock
bfg a/t- road with some offroading, light on mud ok with rocks

everybody please add to this list...
:bump
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
255mm = 10in.

How wide are you going with your rim?

http://www.bfgoodrichtires.com/specs/mud-terrain-t-a-km/1152.html

The 255/75/17 BFG T/A KM fits on 6.5 - 8.5" rims. So unless you are getting a 9" rim, you'll be good.
exactly. the reason i needed 11 in wide tires is because my wheel is 9 in wide. that's the reason i didn't get the bfg's. love the tire. tirerack had a sale on em for $99 a pop. they went up now, and i need at least a 275. so out of the three which M/T or E/T do you guys think will be my best bet? the Maxxis are the least expensive of the three. but the tread pattern seems a bit mild compared to the other two... i haven't found any non-bias comparisons. all i can find are the manufactures specs, and those will always be positive to sell the tire.
 

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Apart from the KM2, I'm not a fan of the BF Goodrich tires at all. I know a lot of guys run them and like tham, but what I've seen is that the sidewalls crack when run aired down (typicall off-road use) and they are pricey.

I prefer the Coopers, and for your use, I would suggest the STT model. It has a tread pattern somewhat like the Goodyear MTR, but more aggressive. They'll also run good on the highway for you.
http://www.coopertire.com/Flash/index.aspx Look up, light truck, STT

I like Pro Comp tires as well (Cooper makes Pro Comp), and the Pro Comp MT or Xtreme MT would be great choices. I don't like their Xterrain. It side-slips too much.
http://www.procomptires.com/truck-jeep-tires/xtreme-mud-terrain-radial.aspx
http://www.procomptires.com/truck-jeep-tires/radial-mud-terrain.aspx

Stay away from Interco tires unless off-road is your main use. Goodyear MTs are great tires if pure rock is your game. Not so good for mud. They plug up and make gum-balls that slide down hills.

Toyo are good, but heavy. Toyo also makes Nitto. Also good tires that work well, but also heavy.

Maxis tires are also okay, but some folks don't like the idea that they are made by Chen Shin, a Chinese company.

BTW, I'm heavily invested in the off-road world. One son owns his own off-road shop, the other is cheif mechanic for another off-road shop. I am co-founder of UCORA.org, The United Christian Off-Road Alliance. I've seen all these tires run all over the nation on all sorts of terrain, and my opinions are based in actual experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Toyo are good, but heavy. Toyo also makes Nitto. Also good tires that work well, but also heavy.

Maxis tires are also okay, but some folks don't like the idea that they are made by Chen Shin, a Chinese company.

BTW, I'm heavily invested in the off-road world. One son owns his own off-road shop, the other is cheif mechanic for another off-road shop. I am co-founder of UCORA.org, The United Christian Off-Road Alliance. I've seen all these tires run all over the nation on all sorts of terrain, and my opinions are based in actual experience.
thanks for the insightful response, i do appreciate it! :thx
I may hold off on tires until i can research a bit more and read up on them.
I would really like to get a wider tire that will give me the best performance in mud, snow, and occasional sand, since that is what i'll really need M/T's for. the rest of my driving is dirt/gravel and pavement. anyone else have any input that they can contribute? :undecided
 

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Well i am running all-terrains right now but I have done my research. I have went through many offroad forums checking to see what a lot of guys are running and there is nothing but good responses on the BFG KM2 tires. That will be my 33in tire when i get my body lift. You can air down and the tire will flex and not get damaged as some other tires will. Tread design is great.Oh and the sidewalls have a slight tread design for when your in deep mud or rocks the sidewall of the tire will help grip and keep you from getting stuck. And they are not loud on highway. So people say.:m2:
 

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thanks for the insightful response, i do appreciate it! :thx
I may hold off on tires until i can research a bit more and read up on them.
I would really like to get a wider tire that will give me the best performance in mud, snow, and occasional sand, since that is what i'll really need M/T's for. the rest of my driving is dirt/gravel and pavement. anyone else have any input that they can contribute? :undecided
Just keep in mind a wider tire is not always better for mud. There are 2 basic approaches. 1. Is the skinnier the tire, the quicker my tire can dig through the mud to the bottom to get traction. 2. The wider the tire the better I can float across the mud. I prefer #1 always.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just keep in mind a wider tire is not always better for mud. There are 2 basic approaches. 1. Is the skinnier the tire, the quicker my tire can dig through the mud to the bottom to get traction. 2. The wider the tire the better I can float across the mud. I prefer #1 always.
true but a wider tire is better for snow. i will be in snowy conditions more than muddy ones. but thanks again for the input. :thx
 

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true but a wider tire is better for snow. i will be in snowy conditions more than muddy ones. but thanks again for the input. :thx
A lot of the "wisdom" about certain type and sized tires is regional in nature. For instance, in areas where the snow depth is less than 6" or so, a narrow tire that bites through to the road is much preferred to a wider tire that floats on top. In areas where the snow is deep (like off-roading in Colorado in the winter) you want big x huge tires, aired down to about 5 psi to float on top.

Same deal with mud. In areas where there IS a bottom it is best to bite through it for traction, but that isn't every where in the nation! Some areas have no "bottom" to mud, so biting down just gets you in deeper. Also, in some areas, the mud is loam while in other areas the mud is clay. WAY different technique and tire style needed for each.

Then, there is sand, which is its own animal. It takes a lot of flotation to run sand well -- and a lot of horsepower as well. Sand sucks up power worse than almost anything else I've seen.

If you want rocks, that too can change depending on where you wheel. In Moab, for instance, you need a tire that can stand the 80 grit surface that will eat tread like popcorn. You also need some serious sidewalls to deal with both cactus and sharp-edged rock. Back East, the rocks are more rounded (like big boulders) and are often slippery and even moss or mud covered. They take a flexy tire that sticks like glue, and that has the ability to warm up and spin down through the slick surface to stick to whatever is there.

For running fire lanes, gravel, etc., almost any tire will do -- and in most cases an AT tire like the BFG KM AT is probably a good bet. You don't really need ultimate traction, as you will never really run into anything that stresses traction that much -- at least, not like trying to run a rock ridge where the only available traction is on one tire, and you're trying to pull a truck forward on that (while running the risk of dying from a roll down a cliff -- welcome to Kentucky wheeling! :yes: ).

I've wheeled all over the nation, and have seen all sorts of stuff, and it has stretched my view of what works where.

So, first, know where you live and wheel, then second, look for a specific tire that works best where YOU live -- and don't pay too much heed to those who live somewhere else. The tires I suggested are good all around choices, and ones I'd run in a heart beat anywhere in the nation with the circumstances you describe.

My current build is on 38s, and I'm running Swamper Radials 15.5 x 38 x 15 size that are both grooved and siped. They'll work on most stuff, and hinder me on some, but in my area, they should take care of business.

My Trailblazer is on Cooper ATRs 255 x 70 x 16. LOVE them on wet/slippery streets, the light slushy snow and ice we get in Louisville, KY, and of course, the bit of off-road (mostly fire lanes and fields) I see with this truck. They are a MILE better than the Bridgestones I just took off.
 

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Wow, great advice. Better than I could provide.

All I can say, is I have had good luck with BFG TA KMs. I'll reccommend them. You can see in the TECORE thread what I put them through and for the price, I think they'd be hard to beat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
i think i have narrowed down a wheel and tire combo. question is should i get the full size spare as well? its another $400, but because my stock spare will no longer work with the new bolt pattern i'm really leaning towards it... this is getting crazy... wheeler's, it's a must have am I right? or should i just grab a spare off of a hummer or avalanche and not rotate it? (mainly just a back up incase of emergency? opinions please. :thx
 

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i think i have narrowed down a wheel and tire combo. question is should i get the full size spare as well? its another $400, but because my stock spare will no longer work with the new bolt pattern i'm really leaning towards it... this is getting crazy... wheeler's, it's a must have am I right? or should i just grab a spare off of a hummer or avalanche and not rotate it? (mainly just a back up incase of emergency? opinions please. :thx
I have a fullsize spare. The issue is that you cannot store your spare under your truck if it is over 30". You'll either have to store it on your roof, inside the trunk, or hanging off the back. That opens up another can of beans.

Remember, if you get a flat tire, you can always take off your spacer too and use the stock spare. Thats fine for a road flat... off road is a different thing.
 
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