Chevy TrailBlazer, TrailBlazer SS and GMC Envoy Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was able to drive away with only a moderate case of whiplash and only cosmetic damage to the driver side front fender and bumper/grill/header panel. Of course there's is more to the repairs than just what I listed, but I'll save you the grocery list of parts. Where I'm stalled out at now is trying to figure out what brand/type of glue is needed to glue my undamaged styrofoam impact absorber into my new bumper cover. All I have been able to determine with my online searches is that I need to use some type of automotive hot melt glue. Sooo, what brand should I get and where can I find it?

I've asked the guys at my local O'Reilly's, Auto Zone and Advanced Auto stores, and all they have in stock are epoxies and sprays. The only hot melt glue they have is for the DIY dent and ding repair kit, and the strength of that stuff barely qualifies it for that job as it is. All Google, Yahoo and Bing are giving me for my efforts are ads for what Walmart, Auto Zone, O'Reilly's and Advanced Auto have in their respective stores which I have already crossed off as unviable for my problem. Does anyone here have a suggestion?
 

·
Registered
2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer LT EXT
Joined
·
387 Posts
Why not just wander into your local body shop and ask for their advice.
Most small shops would be glad to tell you...who knows, maybe you will need to paint your bumper ?
 

·
Registered
2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer LT EXT
Joined
·
387 Posts
Or...look up a body shop supply shop in your area. They will sell you the correct material as they are very well versed in what works and what does not
 

·
Registered
2006 chevy trailblazer_lt_ext
Joined
·
286 Posts
My latest project car is a 2004 SAAB 9-3 Aero cabrio. Beautiful car except the dingbat daughter of the previous owner wrecked the front lip spoiler and bumper. Not stereotyping here, he actually told me this.

You need a plastic welder. Look up “Polyvalence“ or “plastic welding bumper“ on YouTube. I bought one and it’s paid for itself already. I then picked up two 3M / Bondo flexible bumper repair kits for the filler and all the associated sandpapers (80 through 800). I’ve got the chin spoiler welded, filled, and primered. The bumper is welded and filled. Waiting for favorable weather to prime that and paint both (lime yellow metallic)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Why ain't the drunk paying for it and why ain't he in jail?
Well, there's a bit more to the back story that should clarify things. He is in jail, it wasn't his car (belonged to his dad), and both insurance companies (mine and his) declared my Trailblazer totaled, but confirmed it was below the threshold for being declared a complete write off and I was allowed to keep it. The damage was all cosmetic, aside from needing a four wheel alignment, which has saved me a massive headache in a major way. Because I opted to retain ownership, they would not pay for the repairs so I am using the check (just under $3200) to cover the parts and labor on my own. Seeing as I was laid off back at the end of July thanks to Covid and my previous employers financial constraints, the bulk of that check went to cover other expenses such as rent, food, and such. What was left was enough to buy the few parts I needed to complete the repairs well enough to get the Trailblazer cleared to go back on the road. To be honest, I prefer it this way, as I am a body guy and love this stuff. I have found a 3M industrial grade hot melt glue that works great for styrofoam to plastic applications just like mine (I think, I'm still waiting for the box to get here so I haven't confirmed that yet) and will let everyone know how it turns out. Pics are soon to be coming.
 

·
Registered
2006 chevy trailblazer_lt_ext
Joined
·
286 Posts
Why ain't the drunk paying for it and why ain't he in jail?
I have found a 3M industrial grade hot melt glue that works great for styrofoam to plastic applications just like mine
That is the stuff in the giant two-part epoxy tubes, yes? Never toyed with this. Let us know how it works for you.
Glad you weren’t badly injured
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
That is the stuff in the giant two-part epoxy tubes, yes? Never toyed with this. Let us know how it works for you.
Glad you weren’t badly injured
Actually, no. This type of glue comes in sticks that are applied with a good old glue stick heat gun. The reason you need this type of glue is that the styrofoam does not fit flush inside the bumper cover. Because of the small, (about 1.5-2.5 mm gap), you need a glue that either expands, or is thick enough to span the gap and still adhere to both the styrofoam of the absorber/spacer and the inside of the plastic bumper cover. They make spacers that screw into place, but those require drilling into the steel bumper reinforcement and rattle between the cover and reinforcement if you aren't able to place in the right spot and bolt it down correctly. I personally don't like that option, and seeing as how my absorber was in perfect shape, I opted to glue it back in position. I received the glue today and will add a pic of the results by the weekend. Here is the product sheet (.pdf file) listing the different types of hot melt glues. I purchase two types, #3764 and #3779. After reviewing the spec sheets for both, I think I'll end up using #3779, but will keep both types for future projects as needed. 3M strongly recommends using their hot melt gun, but I found the Ryobi One+ glue gun works just as well and only costs around $32, give or take a couple buck for taxes. Here are the links:

Product Guide and Spec Sheet:

Type #3779:

Type #3764:

Ryobi One+ Hot Glue Gun:
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top