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2004 chevy trailblazer_ls
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Searched, havent found anything for installation. Got the ground force springs, although im not sure how happy i will be with them, i dont think there gonna drop it as much as id like but oh well i guess :(

Anyway Ive installed springs, and coilovers on several cars. However the trailblazer seems to be a bit different. The back looks pretty simple but im still not sure on the process? Just bought alot of stuff this week and the install was quoted as 200.00, I have air tools and everything else so id like to atleast hold on to some money in my pocket. Any help or instructions on how to exactly install these would be helpful. Maybe I can take some exact pix during my install to help others since I was unable to find anything.
 

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2002 gmc envoy_slt
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Well, the backs are a piece of cake!

1) Raise one side at a time and place a jack stand under the frame, allowing the axle to hang down. (Initially unbreak/loosen the lugs before lifting).

2) Remove the wheel

3) Unbolt the lower shock mount

4) Push down on the axle, reach in and pull out the original spring

5) Move the upper spring cap (rubber insulator) onto GF spring (NOTE: Closely spaced coils are the TOP with the GF springs).

6) Push down on the axle and push the GF spring into place.

7) Pull bump stop out form holder and cut off 1.75 inches from top....from the FLAT end, not the tapered end. (Ignore the instructions, only cut 1.75 inches, their amount is too much).

8) Push bump stop back into place

9) Re-install the lower shock mounting bolt, washer and nut and tighten

10) Re-install wheel (criss-cross tighten the nuts)

11) Remove jack stand and slowly lower vehicle until tire is touching the ground

12) Final torque lug nuts

13) Finish lowering vehicle and remove jack.

14) Repeat on other side of vehicle


The fronts require a bit more work and you'll need some decent quality spring compressors, hammer and pitman arm puller. Also have new front shocks standing by, there's a high probability that the nut will NOT come off the shaft, if you've visited salty roads.

1) Raise vehicle and support with jack stand(s)

2) Remove wheel

3) Remove the nut holding the lower shock mount to the lower control arm bushing/stud.

4) Strike the lower shock mount with a hammer to see if she'll just pop off....it most likely will NOT. If not, lightly thread removed nut onto bushing/stud. (To protect the threads). Use pitman arm puller to free mount from lower control arm.

5) Loosen 2 upper shock/strut to frame mounting nuts.....DO NOT REMOVE THE CENTER NUT THAT HOLDS THE STRUT ASSEMBLY TOGETHER!

6) Remove the entire strut assembly from the vehicle

7) Using the spring compressors crank down on the spring until it is no longer being held compressed by the shock/strut.

8) Carefully loosen the top nut on the assembly that holds the entire assembly together. (You'll need a box wrench and either a big allen or small socket to hold the center shaft from turning. (This is usually what will break, if the shock has been on the vehicle for a while).

9) Carefully remove the spring stop or upper bearing place assembly from the strut/shock, taking note of the spring orientation.

10) Carefully slide the spring off the strut and very slowly release sprint compressors, until spring is fully extended and not under pressure

*** You may wish to also cut approximately 3/4 to 1 inch off of the front bump stops (foam on the strut shaft). I've seen those that say it must be done, others say it is not needed.....I cut mine, not sure it was necessary. ***

11) Compress GF springs with spring compressors, until short enough to fit on strut/shock and upper bearing plate assembly fits. (Be careful, springs hold lots of engergy)

12) Replace the upper bearing plate assembly and washers

13) Replace nut that holds assembly together and fully tighten to spec

14) Slowly release the spring compressors, until you can remove them from the spring.

15) Place strut assembly back into vehicle and tighten the two upper nuts that hold the assembly to the frame

16) Slide lower mount onto the bushing/bolt of the lower control arm.....you may need to lean on lower control arm in order to line it up.

17) Replace Nut on lower mount strut mount to control arm bushing/bolt and tighten to spec. (Its around 84 LB/FT if memory serves me correctly.....use a torque wrench!)

18) Reinstall wheel and tighten lugs to specification (You may need to partially lower vehicle to prevent wheels from turning).

19) Finish lowering vehicle and final tighten/torque lug nuts

20) Repeat on other side

21) Seek alignment! - You're camber will be off enough to cause severe tire wear, so get an alignment within the next 100 miles or so.

Now, if you have another vehicle, you have the option of taking both spring assemblies to a garage and asking them to use their wall/floor mounted compressor to swap the springs for you. They usually don't charge s whole lot and it eliminates the possibility of being injured if you're not sure of how to compress a spring. I did mine in the driveway, however I've replaced struts before on other vehicles and owned the tools.
 

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2004 chevy trailblazer_ls
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Well, the backs are a piece of cake!

1) Raise one side at a time and place a jack stand under the frame, allowing the axle to hang down. (Initially unbreak/loosen the lugs before lifting).

2) Remove the wheel

3) Unbolt the lower shock mount

4) Push down on the axle, reach in and pull out the original spring

5) Move the upper spring cap (rubber insulator) onto GF spring (NOTE: Closely spaced coils are the TOP with the GF springs).

6) Push down on the axle and push the GF spring into place.

7) Pull bump stop out form holder and cut off 1.75 inches from top....from the FLAT end, not the tapered end. (Ignore the instructions, only cut 1.75 inches, their amount is too much).

8) Push bump stop back into place

9) Re-install the lower shock mounting bolt, washer and nut and tighten

10) Re-install wheel (criss-cross tighten the nuts)

11) Remove jack stand and slowly lower vehicle until tire is touching the ground

12) Final torque lug nuts

13) Finish lowering vehicle and remove jack.

14) Repeat on other side of vehicle


The fronts require a bit more work and you'll need some decent quality spring compressors, hammer and pitman arm puller. Also have new front shocks standing by, there's a high probability that the nut will NOT come off the shaft, if you've visited salty roads.

1) Raise vehicle and support with jack stand(s)

2) Remove wheel

3) Remove the nut holding the lower shock mount to the lower control arm bushing/stud.

4) Strike the lower shock mount with a hammer to see if she'll just pop off....it most likely will NOT. If not, lightly thread removed nut onto bushing/stud. (To protect the threads). Use pitman arm puller to free mount from lower control arm.

5) Loosen 2 upper shock/strut to frame mounting nuts.....DO NOT REMOVE THE CENTER NUT THAT HOLDS THE STRUT ASSEMBLY TOGETHER!

6) Remove the entire strut assembly from the vehicle

7) Using the spring compressors crank down on the spring until it is no longer being held compressed by the shock/strut.

8) Carefully loosen the top nut on the assembly that holds the entire assembly together. (You'll need a box wrench and either a big allen or small socket to hold the center shaft from turning. (This is usually what will break, if the shock has been on the vehicle for a while).

9) Carefully remove the spring stop or upper bearing place assembly from the strut/shock, taking note of the spring orientation.

10) Carefully slide the spring off the strut and very slowly release sprint compressors, until spring is fully extended and not under pressure

*** You may wish to also cut approximately 3/4 to 1 inch off of the front bump stops (foam on the strut shaft). I've seen those that say it must be done, others say it is not needed.....I cut mine, not sure it was necessary. ***

11) Compress GF springs with spring compressors, until short enough to fit on strut/shock and upper bearing plate assembly fits. (Be careful, springs hold lots of engergy)

12) Replace the upper bearing plate assembly and washers

13) Replace nut that holds assembly together and fully tighten to spec

14) Slowly release the spring compressors, until you can remove them from the spring.

15) Place strut assembly back into vehicle and tighten the two upper nuts that hold the assembly to the frame

16) Slide lower mount onto the bushing/bolt of the lower control arm.....you may need to lean on lower control arm in order to line it up.

17) Replace Nut on lower mount strut mount to control arm bushing/bolt and tighten to spec. (Its around 84 LB/FT if memory serves me correctly.....use a torque wrench!)

18) Reinstall wheel and tighten lugs to specification (You may need to partially lower vehicle to prevent wheels from turning).

19) Finish lowering vehicle and final tighten/torque lug nuts

20) Repeat on other side

21) Seek alignment! - You're camber will be off enough to cause severe tire wear, so get an alignment within the next 100 miles or so.

Now, if you have another vehicle, you have the option of taking both spring assemblies to a garage and asking them to use their wall/floor mounted compressor to swap the springs for you. They usually don't charge s whole lot and it eliminates the possibility of being injured if you're not sure of how to compress a spring. I did mine in the driveway, however I've replaced struts before on other vehicles and owned the tools.
This seems like great info, Im more of a visual learner though..lol Is there anypix or anything anywhereee?


didnt plan on new struts of shocks, im sure ill need them though im approaching 100k miles. I live in the desert so my car is pretty rust free compared to alot ive seen.

As for "
8) Carefully loosen the top nut on the assembly that holds the entire assembly together. (You'll need a box wrench and either a big allen or small socket to hold the center shaft from turning. (This is usually what will break, if the shock has been on the vehicle for a while)."

All cars ive done, have a hex or allen on the top, and then a place to hold both while you turn the nut. However when Ive done it with air tools you dont need to hold anything, you just hit it with the impact and it comes apart? Same with TB?

Lastly, you say to get an alignment. Im aware of this on most cars, where the tie rods are attached to the strut assembly. You note that camber will be off enough, which really doesnt matter when you go to align the TB it doesnt have a camber adjustment anyway does it? That just seems incorrect, again im coming from cars, and ive seen some pretty bad camber with still not bad tire wear.
 

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2002 gmc envoy_slt
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Not sure anybody has posted pics of the process and unfortunately I didn't take any when I did the work. I also hit just about every problem that could arise when I did mine, with a stripped head on the driver side shock, etc. (I ended up cutting the nut in half with my Roto-Zip and a diamond cutting wheel).

Air should knock the nut out the same as on any strut front suspension vehicle as you've surmised.

YES we have camber and caster adjustments on our trucks, but you adjust it at the lower control arm and not the upper strut mount. The lower control arm to frame bracket uses elongated bolt holes to allow the adjustment. You loosen then bolts to the frame and then pry the bracket (with attached lower control arm) to achieve the alignment you need. The good thing is that with the GF springs, you'll be able to get the camber back into spec.....with Belltech's 2" drop, that usually isn't possible and the upper ball-joint also is left at a rather precarious angle. - Word of advice, ask for the sheet when the alignment is done, many shops don't bother to get the camber & caster where it should be. Have them align to SS specs, with the lowering kit, you're tires will thank you.
 

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2006 chevy trailblazer_lt
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I took the strut to the bench grinder with a wire wheel and hit the top bolt before trying to loosen it...and then sprayed it with blaster and air wouldnt take it off.....I had to use old fashion hand tools.

As far as alignment the questions was answered correctly in the post above.
 

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2004 chevy trailblazer_ls
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Was looking around under the truck right now, where is the back bump stop? On top of the spring or something?
 

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This seems like great info, Im more of a visual learner though..lol Is there anypix or anything anywhereee?


didnt plan on new struts of shocks, im sure ill need them though im approaching 100k miles. I live in the desert so my car is pretty rust free compared to alot ive seen.

As for "
8) Carefully loosen the top nut on the assembly that holds the entire assembly together. (You'll need a box wrench and either a big allen or small socket to hold the center shaft from turning. (This is usually what will break, if the shock has been on the vehicle for a while)."

All cars ive done, have a hex or allen on the top, and then a place to hold both while you turn the nut. However when Ive done it with air tools you dont need to hold anything, you just hit it with the impact and it comes apart? Same with TB?

Lastly, you say to get an alignment. Im aware of this on most cars, where the tie rods are attached to the strut assembly. You note that camber will be off enough, which really doesnt matter when you go to align the TB it doesnt have a camber adjustment anyway does it? That just seems incorrect, again im coming from cars, and ive seen some pretty bad camber with still not bad tire wear.


I am going to say this since a lot of people are thinking it... WHY do you find it necessary to argue EVERY time someone replies to any one of the dozens of questions you ask? For example, the reply you got in post number 3 of this thread looks to be a copy and paste of the exact instructions from GM AND CHEVY on how to do this. Yet you choose to argue or question the response. Face facts man, the GMT-360 is not like EVERY other car you have worked on... if you already know so much, why do you keep on asking. If you don't want an answer, DON'T ASK. also...if you are more of a hands on guy.. why ask how do it, if you only want pictures.

Sorry bro.. I am just a bit tired of how you show your graditude to the members who ARE trying to help you.

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
when the first thing i said was "This seems like great info" seems like ur stretching things a bit.

as far as asking about camber, I dont know too many cars with stock camber adjustments, i just learned the trailblazer apparently does, although from not taking it apart im still not too sure i see where any slotted holes would be. Usually with springs on a car its fine without a camber kit i suppose that can be argued too, but i know from experience ive never had any significant tire wear on a car on just springs. With my TL on coilovers and as low as I could get it, of course then i added a camber kit. I know alot of the general know-how, hell ive put an engine in on my own before, and im sure i could just go to the garage and "wing it" however i get frustrated easily is why it may seem like i ask alot of questions. An example would be the lower control arm, if i couldnt get it off i would of been pissed and not wanted to even do anymore and would take it somewhere, here i learned the puller can take it off fairly easily. Maybe its just easier to pretend im stupid in order to get the best info, so im able to complete the job the quickest without running into any snags.
Overall i want to make sure im 110% able to do a job before i start, if my posts make you feel uncomfortable each thread clearly states who made it before you have to click open the link and read. If it bothers you so much, just stop coming to my threads, you wont hurt my feelings.
 

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the Trailblazer is a totally different beast than an Acura.. if you really doubt us just pick up a Haynes manual to get all the visual stuff..
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
the Trailblazer is a totally different beast than an Acura.. if you really doubt us just pick up a Haynes manual to get all the visual stuff..
actually when it comes to suspension I've noticed there are indeed alot of similarities, dont recall doubting anyone. Only thing ive noticed different is the back spring doesnt go around the strut like the front, and that the front strut assembly is attached to the LCA, instead of a knuckle.
 

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actually when it comes to suspension I've noticed there are indeed alot of similarities, dont recall doubting anyone. Only thing ive noticed different is the back spring doesnt go around the strut like the front, and that the front strut assembly is attached to the LCA, instead of a knuckle.
Yes. The rear spring doesn't have a strut to go around because we have a solid axle and a five-link design. Not McPherson struts. And the coilover in the front is attached to the control arm because it also isn't a McPherson strut.

McPherson struts are cheaper for unibody vehicles, but we have all sorts of strong suspension design elements because we do 4WD and offroad and all that stuff. I think the only thing similar is that we have coils instead of torsion bars or leafs. Oh, and there are four shocks.
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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Dude, the point is that if you ask for advice, people are going to give it to you. Whether or not you agree with it is up to you. But don't question the advice we give you because some of us have actually put in the wrench time on our trucks and know how they work just a little bit better than you do. I've worked on a lot of cars, and didn't know anything about these until I asked, got answers, and listened. Please don't explain yourself. Just leave the nasty comments to yourself, ask questions in a nice way about things not clear to you, and apologize if you offend people. We are here to help each other and share a common interest, not bicker like my parents.
 

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2002 gmc envoy_sle
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Dude, the point is that if you ask for advice, people are going to give it to you. Whether or not you agree with it is up to you. But don't question the advice we give you because some of us have actually put in the wrench time on our trucks and know how they work just a little bit better than you do. I've worked on a lot of cars, and didn't know anything about these until I asked, got answers, and listened. Please don't explain yourself. Just leave the nasty comments to yourself, ask questions in a nice way about things not clear to you, and apologize if you offend people. We are here to help each other and share a common interest, not bicker like my parents.
:iagree: well put; couldn't have said it better myself
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
damn you are a bunch of heart felt dudes on here arent u, i feel like im at the counselors office, not a car website
 

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2004 gmc
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We are much more of a family here than other sites. Some members fall into the role of parents, some act like rebellious teenagers. Often, the use of punctuation and spelling and other little clues like attitude suggest the initial relationship long-term members take towards new ones. Not to automatically assume you're young or need parenting, but here's an example:

"An example would be the lower control arm, if i couldnt get it off i would of been pissed and not wanted to even do anymore and would take it somewhere"

That just doesn't come across as the attitude of an experienced and mature owner who's serious about improving their trailvoy.

See how you come across from our point of view?

Now start using punctuation and apostrophes in the proper places, and you'll suddenly gain ten years of apparent age.
 

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I just spent 2 minutes searching. I looked specifically in the Suspension section for the word "install". After browsing the results, I came across a thread that went into detail about replacing the front struts. Here's a clue... since it is all 1 assembly, in order to replace the struts, you have to remove the spring. I believe this was mentioned in another thread you started. That thread even had pictures!

EDIT:

I can get a good look at a T-bone by sticking my head up a bull's @ss, but I'd rather take a butcher's word for it.
 
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