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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So there are quite a few events and possibilities here. I will try to be as concise as possible.
2007 chevrolet trailblazer, 4.2l
Rebuilt 4l60e Transmission Nov 6th 2021, approx 10k miles
Chain of events:

  1. Refill low coolant reservoir (1 month ago). My truck never loses coolant.
  2. Notice some harsh shifts especially 1-2. And delayed and powerful 2-3 downshift. If i'm on the gas in certain situations the 2-3 upshift almost chirps the tires at highway speeds. The speedo needle literally jumps on the 2-3 upshift shift. (3 weeks ago)
  3. Coming home on I-94 with the cruise control set at around 85. Cruise control shuts off by itself. (few days ago) Pull a code for P1810 (Transmission Fluid Pressure Manual Valve Position Switch)
  4. Yesterday, notice a trail of smoke every time i accelerate. Its almost gray/white. Further investigation reveals fluid near the underbody of the car, specifiaclly on the downstream o2 sensor. and coating nearby surfaces. This is what causes the smoke behind me.
  5. I check the dipstick, i discover a trans that is quite overfilled. Fearing black and burnt fluid, it is pink, but looks like its been mixed with water. or maybe antifreeze.
The transmission is under warranty, however a quick glance reveals that the warranty does not cover work related to failure of radiators/ coolant lines etc. I'm going to take it in tomorrow. Is it possible he might be able to flush the trans and bypass my factory radiator/ heat transfer thingy and use only the aux cooler that i have installed?

either way i need a new coolant radiator for my engine, is that correct?

is there any other type of thing that could cause this? i mean its cloudy milky fluid, why would it be like that.

are there any arguments i can use to my advantage if he decides not to honor the warranty. I have access to a very good attorney that is free to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Should he deny, are there any fixes i can try on my own?

also its worth mentioning, the harsh shifts are non existent on a cold start until i make it 7 minutes down the road.
 

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2004 chevy trailblazer_ls
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You can try doing several flushes on the transmission until the fluid runs clear red, then flush it a few more times AFTER you replace the radiator.
If you discovered the 'strawberry milk shake' almost immediatley after it happened, it MAY be ok. The anti freeze in the trans fluid eats the clutches in the trans, so it's iffy.
It's also not the rebuilders fault, the trans cooler in the radiator wasn't leaking when he did the trans?
 

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'05 Chevy TB EXT
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4,051 Posts
Ya know I was so close to bypassing that stupid radiator when I added the secondary cooler. I knew I should have done it.
That your heat exchanger failed --- and it's NOT a transmission cooler because it tries to keep the fluid at 160°F-180°F --- it did so for a reason ... probably age.

IF you add an auxiliary cooler, add it before the fluid gets to the radiator --- so the engine coolant - which is at close to 205°F, will bring the fluid back to the normal operating temperature.

An overcooled transmission is just as bad as an overheated one. They NEED to run in that narrow temperature range for maximum life.

Coolant is pretty much instant destruction in a transmission. It's the water, not that the coolant itself is also destructive, but not a bad as the water - it boils.

Flushing a few times will likely be expensive and the damage is already done. The friction material will flake off and just destroy the unit in short time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
so the trans shop said the only way they would touch it was with a rebuild.

Knowing I wasn't going to do it again, the shop owner recommended a temporary heat exchanger bypass, (which would be un-bypassed before winter), and an engine-running do it at home yourself flush, which could buy me anywhere from 100-1500 miles according to him, but he guaranteed it would certainly result in catastrophic failure from the clutch material flaking off sooner rather than later.

Then he recommended I swap in a junkyard unit, or learn how to rebuild my own transmissions since my justifiable transmission budget has been expended and will not be replenished, ever.
 
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