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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey,

So I'm new to this site, which I have been viewing for awhile and been searching for an answer. I may have just missed it in my search for a solved solution.

I just recently did some work on the front end on my 02' Trailblazer 4x4. I replaced the upper and lower ball joints, stabilizer bar end-links, and tie rods ends with Moog parts. While I was in there I decided to replace the wheel hub/bearing assemblies with Timkens.

So then I decided while I was doing it, I was going to replace the brake rotor and pads on both front wheels. So I bought the Power Stop Performance Brake Upgrade Kit; Incl. 12.01 in. Silver Zinc Plated Cross-Drilled And Slotted Rotors w/Z16 Ceramic Scorched Pads for front passenger and driver side. Well, I found that one of the guide bolts for the caliper to the bracket was seized on the driver side and got a good deal on a remanufactured caliper/bracket from a buddies dad at Napa. Well, I then decided to replace the passengers caliper and bracket as well.

My problem is that I noticed the new power stop rotors are maybe an 1/8" or less thicker than the stock ones and my pads are rubbing the rotors. I bled the front brakes. I can turn the wheels by hand with a little effort. I feel there is a little too much drag on the rotors as I can hear it rubbing when turning the wheel.

Long novel coming to an end here, what should I do? I didn't let the calipers hand by the hoses (I zip tied them up). I didn't have rubbing issues prior to this but they were pretty worn. I read I could sand down the pads? Is this realistic or what can I do here? I've got enough time into this project than I want to have and would like to get this finished up.

Thanks for reading this entire thing and I appreciate any help you might be able to provide or even some guidance on what to do/check/fix/smash with a hammer.
 

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2006 saab 9_7x
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12 Posts
Yes, you can sand down the pads if you take them back off. You should be careful to try and keep them as flat and parallel as possible. I have done this already with a new set of new pads and and rotors that were too thick.

I hit mine lightly on a disc sander at work and than taped a coarse (120 grit) sheet of sandpaper down on a steel table and flat sanded there. Make sure you wear a dust mask or have good ventilation though...:thumbsup:

If you do not do this, they will usually super-heat which expands the materials even more causing them to really bind up. I had a friend have this happen to him and he really smoked his new brakes, even warped the brand new rotors!:duh:
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response. How much did you end up taking off? Are they pretty easy to sand? I'd hate to sad too much off beings they are brand new and I don't want to shorten their life more than I'd have to.

Do you think the rotor being slightly thicker is the culprit of the dragging? I just want to make sure that I'm not missing something here such as a master cylinder or anything else.
 

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chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
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46 Posts
There is a possibility you may have front brake pads for a 7 passenger. I own a 2004 Chevy Trailblazer EXT LS 5.3L V-8 7 passenger 129 wheel base.
When you ordered you pads and rotors was it for your TB type?

7 passenger TB have thicker pads due to the extra weight. You should not be having that problem at all. Also you mentioned you changed out your calipers they may have a different off set that could also be the cause.
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
There is a possibility you may have front brake pads for a 7 passenger. I own a 2004 Chevy Trailblazer EXT LS 5.3L V-8 7 passenger 129 wheel base.
When you ordered you pads and rotors was it for your TB type?

7 passenger TB have thicker pads due to the extra weight. You should not be having that problem at all. Also you mentioned you changed out your calipers they may have a different off set that could also be the cause.
I replaced everything with the 113" wheelbase parts as I have the 5 passenger trailblazer. I also replaced the caliper with reman calipers that were identical to the ones I took off.
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
As I'm looking at the parts I ordered from RockAuto.. the Power Stop #k2057 kit (for the trailblazer with two rows of seats) and the Power Stop #k2061 (for the trailblazer with three rows of seats) use the same evolution z16 ceramic scorched pads. the only different between the kits is the k2061 has larger diameter rotors.

I guess there's a chance these pads might be too thick for the factory calipers? Should I just try some OEM pads and see if that fixes it or should I just sand these pads down?
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ltz
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7 Posts
What did you end up doing? It's getting close to time to replace my '02 TB's rotors and pads, and I'm thinking of getting the Power Stop Z36 Truck & Tow Caliper Brake Kit for $326 shipped (the red calipers looks similar to my old ap racing braking setup on my former car, so that will make me smile and unlike my current calipers weren't exposed to 10 years of michigan weather) In theory with their calipers, there shouldn't be any rubbing so seems like it's worth the ~$143 premium over the non caliper kit, but I did want to know how you dealt with rubbing on your stock calipers before I pull the trigger. (or you know, if anyone wants to warn me away from the Z36/caliper kit....)
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
It ended up being the dust shield running the back of the rotor lol. I laughed when I saw it after all that I did to try to figure it out. So they went on perfectly.
 
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