Chevy TrailBlazer, TrailBlazer SS and GMC Envoy Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
2007 chevy trailblazer_ss_3ss
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you guys normally check your oil level??
Manual stated to check the oil when it is warm. Wouldn't the oil be sloshed around?

I have always checked the oil level when it is cold? or after it has been sitting for a while.

I would figure checking it cold would be the best way to get an accurate reading? I have the 5.3l engine so which is correct? If check when It is cold my oil level is in the middle.. If I check when it is warm. my oil level is over the maximum amount.
 

·
Registered
2003 chevy trailblazer_ls
Joined
·
5,268 Posts
at operating temp- shut off engine- and let it sit for a few minutes to allow oil to make its way back down to the oil pan- check oil.
 

·
Registered
2005 chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
How do you guys normally check your oil level??
Manual stated to check the oil when it is warm. Wouldn't the oil be sloshed around?

I have always checked the oil level when it is cold? or after it has been sitting for a while.

I would figure checking it cold would be the best way to get an accurate reading? I have the 5.3l engine so which is correct? If check when It is cold my oil level is in the middle.. If I check when it is warm. my oil level is over the maximum amount.
Yes, my 05 manual states the same thing. I've never understand that. I've always checked the oil in my vehicles before driving in the morning. :weird:
 

·
Registered
2007 gmc
Joined
·
159 Posts
Check it while you are fueling your truck. Oil should be warm and will have a little time to settle while you start filling the tank.
 

·
Registered
2005 chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
Could someone please explain to me WHY it should be checked warm? Are you saying oil expands as it gets hot?

For many decades I've been checking it cold. That way ALL the oil has drained down into the oil pan.
 

·
Western Canada Chapter
2003
Joined
·
6,411 Posts
It should be checked at it's point of greatest volume. As all of us old school guys remember that if the crankshaft comes into direct contact with the oil in the pan the results are not good. That's why people die when they jump off bridges .... liquids are like cement at high velocities.:m2:
 

·
Registered
2003 chevy trailblazer_ls
Joined
·
1,708 Posts
It should be checked at it's point of greatest volume. As all of us old school guys remember that if the crankshaft comes into direct contact with the oil in the pan the results are not good. That's why people die when they jump off bridges .... liquids are like cement at high velocities.:m2:
Yes, but do you remember the dipper sticks on the crank shaft, the splash system????? (216 chevy for one)
 

·
Registered
2005 chevy trailblazer_ls
Joined
·
269 Posts
Could someone please explain to me WHY it should be checked warm? Are you saying oil expands as it gets hot?

For many decades I've been checking it cold. That way ALL the oil has drained down into the oil pan.
the reason to check your oil warm is because you should check your oil at normal operating temperature. it will give you the most accurate results. too hot, your oil level will seem a bit high. too cold your oil will seem too low. too much oil in your motor will cause a negative effect just as running a vehicle with too little oil. :m2:
 

·
Registered
2005 chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
the reason to check your oil warm is because you should check your oil at normal operating temperature. it will give you the most accurate results. too hot, your oil level will seem a bit high. too cold your oil will seem too low. too much oil in your motor will cause a negative effect just as running a vehicle with too little oil. :m2:
You know - I've been checking engine oil for almost 60 years. I've never noticed a difference on ANY vehicle I've owned, between hot and cold.

Now transmission oil, that's a different story. I find it interesting that the manuals for other vehicles (non GM) tell me to check the oil "after the engine has been shut off for at least 10 minutes" but do not say to check it warm.

If what you said about oil being too warm and too cold was true - why don't they mark on the oil dipstick the "cold" range and the "hot" range like they do on the tranny dipstick?

Plus how would one determine is the oil is "warm"? Does the oil become "warm" after 10 minutes of driving - 30 minutes? At what point does it become "hot"?
How about on a long trip that I often take. Should I let the oil cool down for an hour so it isn't hot anymore and therefore get a more accurate reading? :D
 

·
Western Canada Chapter
2003
Joined
·
6,411 Posts
Yes, but do you remember the dipper sticks on the crank shaft, the splash system????? (216 chevy for one)
You know - I've been checking engine oil for almost 60 years. I've never noticed a difference on ANY vehicle I've owned, between hot and cold.

Now transmission oil, that's a different story. I find it interesting that the manuals for other vehicles (non GM) tell me to check the oil "after the engine has been shut off for at least 10 minutes" but do not say to check it warm.

If what you said about oil being too warm and too cold was true - why don't they mark on the oil dipstick the "cold" range and the "hot" range like they do on the tranny dipstick?

Plus how would one determine is the oil is "warm"? Does the oil become "warm" after 10 minutes of driving - 30 minutes? At what point does it become "hot"?
How about on a long trip that I often take. Should I let the oil cool down for an hour so it isn't hot anymore and therefore get a more accurate reading? :D
Holy crap you guys are old :excited: As a young buck of 54 years :bonk: I am not totally familiar with the old 216 (3.5 bore and 3.75 inch stroke) Chevy although my grandfather had an old flathead six in a '51 sedan delivery he owned for what seemed like forever :undecided I don't think they were built to rev back in those days with only 4 main bearings and the long stroke. The dippers and squirters may have worked ok for those old truck engines.

The one thing I do remember is that he never took that beast over 3000 rpm. I think the newer higher revving engines were more susceptible to damage.

But you know what .... like you guys I wonder the same things every time I read the different ways to do the maintenance checks. And here is a question for you - Does it really matter if you put in all 6.6 litres (Canada) of oil if you are changing oil at 3000-5000 miles intervals. I think not. If you want to go the OLM way then It would probably be suitable to top her up.

Sorry for the long post ..... you stimulated my mind :duh:
 

·
Registered
2003 chevy trailblazer_ls
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
I would say, that with the longish oil pan, it DOES matter that we put in all 7 quarts of oil. The level isn't set that way JUST for longevity, but so that the oil pump pickup is adequately submerged during all driving operations.
 

·
Registered
2005 chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
I would say, that with the longish oil pan, it DOES matter that we put in all 7 quarts of oil. The level isn't set that way JUST for longevity, but so that the oil pump pickup is adequately submerged during all driving operations.
:iagree: Absolutely!

Also - since you mention it - being level is very important for getting an accurate reading on this engine.
As I've mentioned on other posts - my driveway has a very slight slope to it. If I check the oil with the vehicle pointing forward it reads low.
If I turn the vehicle 180 degrees, it reads high - almost a quart difference between the two. I figure this is because of the length of the oil pan.
 

·
Registered
2003 chevy trailblazer_ls
Joined
·
1,708 Posts
:iagree: Absolutely!

Also - since you mention it - being level is very important for getting an accurate reading on this engine.
As I've mentioned on other posts - my driveway has a very slight slope to it. If I check the oil with the vehicle pointing forward it reads low.
If I turn the vehicle 180 degrees, it reads high - almost a quart difference between the two. I figure this is because of the length of the oil pan.
Everybody knows that there is more gravity on the down hill side. :crazy:
 

·
Registered
2005 chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
Everybody knows that there is more gravity on the down hill side. :crazy:
Really? You think?:duh: Boy I'm sure glad you told me that - I'd have never figured it out on my own! :weird::rolleyes:

My point was that due to the long pan a little slope makes more of a difference for the I6 than other engines.

I have 3 other vehicles that I park in the same driveway. The slope is so slight that it has VERY little effect on the reading for these vehicles, but they have a MUCH shorter pan than my I6.

Any more smart *** remarks?
 

·
Registered
2003 chevy trailblazer_ls
Joined
·
1,708 Posts
Lighten up, I was not picking on you, honest.
 

·
Banned
2006 gmc envoy_denali
Joined
·
391 Posts
Well, due to my recent blue smoke issue, I will be going to check the oil level. I will be going for a drive first so my oil gets warmed up to temp. Then I'll have a smoke while the oil runs to the pan. Then I'll check the level on level ground. I sure hope I see that it is full!!!
 

·
Banned
2003 gmc envoy_slt
Joined
·
7,190 Posts
If you are really worried about the oil level, check it before you go on a long drive. Make sure it is at least showing on the stick.:m2:
 

·
Registered
2006 chevy trailblazer_lt
Joined
·
721 Posts
Does it really matter if you put in all 6.6 litres (Canada) of oil if you are changing oil at 3000-5000 miles intervals. I think not. If you want to go the OLM way then It would probably be suitable to top her up.
If I understand your question, then I would agree that it does not matter. Check out the chain-yanking discussion/debate on this thread:

http://forums.trailvoy.com/showthread.php?t=50695
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top