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2003 chevy trailblazer_lt_ext
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Discussion Starter #1
Have a 2003 Chevy V6, 4WD, Extra long and am purchasing new tires ASAP. Lots of ice and snow and rough winter roads in the mountains here - suggestions? (do highway and back road driving). Do not want a snow tire - so looking at all terrain truck tires (not all season or touring). Need an tire that can handle this rough winter climate for 5 months,but that can be left on all year. Most important - is traction on snow and ice.

Anyone running any of the following and have feedback?


Michelin LTX A/T 2?
Kumho Road Venture AT KL-78?
Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revo? ?
Nitto Terra Grappler All Terrain?

P.S. - my former SUV was a Mitsubishi Montero (also 4 wheel drive and it had aggressive Kuhmos on it twice over a decade and they were great for that model and body style - but am finding the TB handles very differently (and of course needs new tires - has old crappy ones currently i.e. MasterCraft Courser HTR M+S) which are worn and just don't cut it.
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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257 Posts
Hello neighbor,

I've got the Michelin A/T2 and absolutely love them. I got them in August, so can't attest to the miles you can get out of them yet, but my friend's Yukon has them too and has had them for a year, and the treads still look like new. I didn't even go into 4wd during last week's snow and the icy conditions at night that followed. They gripped like crazy in loose snow and slush. I have used them on dirt roads up in Bailey also for camping trips and were great in the meadow during daily rain storms, where we camped also (with the land owner's permission). Always been a fan of Michelin's. :thumbsup:
 

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2003 chevy trailblazer_lt_ext
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Discussion Starter #3
thanks and what SUV are you in? I do very similar activities

P.S. - I slid all over the slush, ice, snow in last weekend's storm (on old Mastercraft Courser HTRs) - it was a disaster, even at 5-10 MPH.

Hence the urgency - really appreciate the input. Any sugestions regarding stores to purchase them at? Best price and warrantee combo I am finding so far is at Discount Tire. Big O had good prices/warantee - lacked some selection. Will do the road hazzard warrantee... :) After all - we do live in Colorado - ha ha.

What vehicle are your Michelin A/T2s on? Similar size/weight? Do you advocate some chains (as a back up plan for the back country or 1-70 in bad weather)? If so any suggestions.

Thanks for your first reply - that alone is a huge help!!!!!!
Kat

Hello neighbor,

I've got the Michelin A/T2 and absolutely love them. I got them in August, so can't attest to the miles you can get out of them yet, but my friend's Yukon has them too and has had them for a year, and the treads still look like new. I didn't even go into 4wd during last week's snow and the icy conditions at night that followed. They gripped like crazy in loose snow and slush. I have used them on dirt roads up in Bailey also for camping trips and were great in the meadow during daily rain storms, where we camped also (with the land owner's permission). Always been a fan of Michelin's. :thumbsup:
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_lt
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Hello neighbor,

I've got the Michelin A/T2 and absolutely love them. I got them in August, so can't attest to the miles you can get out of them yet, but my friend's Yukon has them too and has had them for a year, and the treads still look like new. I didn't even go into 4wd during last week's snow and the icy conditions at night that followed. They gripped like crazy in loose snow and slush. I have used them on dirt roads up in Bailey also for camping trips and were great in the meadow during daily rain storms, where we camped also (with the land owner's permission). Always been a fan of Michelin's. :thumbsup:
Glad to hear the Michelins work down the mountain, but their not worth a **** up here at Climax (at least on my 2007 3/4 ton). I've got Treadwright Guard Dog M/T's on the TB and so far their awesome!!
 

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2004 chevy trailblazer_ls_ext
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ice is ice no matter what you have, chains arent recommended for the trailblazer. I only run continental contrac TR on mine. they do awesome on the highway and amazing in the new england storms
 

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2002 chevy trailblazer_ls
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I have the short wheel base TB. Chains are a no-no, at least for the fronts. I have seen them on the rear a couple time on TBs, but the upper control arm on our trucks prevent use on the front.
My friend at work with the Yukon with the Michelins just got back from a trip to Vail and they said she had no problems at all.
I got mine at Discount and got the road hazard too.

Any weight in the rear of the 3/4 ton GotSpeed1? When I had the s-10 no tire was worth jack without weight in the back. :m2:
 

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Basic Vendor- Skid Plates
2007 chevy trailblazer_ls
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Everyone's perception of "my tires are good in the snow" is only based on what tires they have run on that particular vehicle, so is largely not a good baseline for performance... Because the data on Tire Rack is largely based on ratings by individuals, it's also not a really good baseline for something that's good in the snow...

There is a good baseline for winter performance, though... The "severe snow service" ("snowflake on mountain") label that the rubber manufacturer's association puts on tires that pass the tests... (i.e. you either need tires with this label on them, or chains, to go over some passes in the winter)
http://www.tirerack.com/winter/tech/techpage.jsp?techid=125

The tires in the stock size (245/65-17) that pass this test are:
Goodyear Wrangler Silentarmor - http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...65TR7WSA&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes

If you go with a slightly different size that still fits without spacers, there are several other options:

255/65-17:

General Grabber AT2 - http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...GRAT2OWL&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes

Wrangler Silentarmor again

245/70-17:

Grabber AT2 again

Silentarmor again

Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac - http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...47QR7WDT&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes



Yes, there are other tires that are good in the snow (Destination AT, LTX AT2, BFG AT KO (Some sizes are rated severe snow, but the 245/70-17 isn't. I have these tires, and they are better than the destination AT tires that we had before, which were worlds better than the stock contitrac TR), etc), but the real test if you're looking for something that is DEFINITELY good in the snow is that "snowflake on the mountain" label on the tire...

Mike
 

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You called it a v6 and your info says its a 6.0. Do you know what motor you have?:raspberry

Barton has some good advice there. Tey use that symbol for a reason and it makes for a good starting point in finding a tire to suit you.
 

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2004 gmc envoy_slt
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I went with the LTX M/S due to their perf on previous vehicles and I am not disappointed. The OEM Michelin Cross Terrain sucked big time! We get plenty of lake effect off of lake Mich and 12-15" of snow is no big deal with these. Windrows don't suck me in like before either.
 

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I'm running Goodyear Wrangler Duratracs (265-70-17) and they have held up very well here in the secondary snow belt. But as stated before ice is ice.
 

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"ice" and "all-terrain" don't belong in the same sentence together. for ice traction you need lots and lots and lots of biting edges. Continental's Extreme WinterContact fits the bill better than any tire. if that wont fit, General Tire's Altimax Arctic is top rated as well.

if you're rolling 16's, this is the tire for you, even for summer. true they will wear away quickly but for what you'd be paying for an all-terrain tire, you might as well buy a cheap winter tire and replace it every two years. $100/tire.

i've had the Firestone Winterforce UV on my TB for the last 3 winters ans 2 summers. they wont last another winter after this one but they will last all summer. you get better traction both accelerating ans stopping with winter tires in winter conditions than an all-season or all-terrain. besides all terrains generally don't clear very well, and wet road traction sucks.

FWIW, my :m2:
 

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"ice" and "all-terrain" don't belong in the same sentence together. for ice traction you need lots and lots and lots of biting edges. Continental's Extreme WinterContact fits the bill better than any tire. if that wont fit, General Tire's Altimax Arctic is top rated as well.

if you're rolling 16's, this is the tire for you, even for summer. true they will wear away quickly but for what you'd be paying for an all-terrain tire, you might as well buy a cheap winter tire and replace it every two years. $100/tire.

i've had the Firestone Winterforce UV on my TB for the last 3 winters ans 2 summers. they wont last another winter after this one but they will last all summer. you get better traction both accelerating ans stopping with winter tires in winter conditions than an all-season or all-terrain. besides all terrains generally don't clear very well, and wet road traction sucks.

FWIW, my :m2:
I don't mean this as an insult, but when was the last time you owned a vehicle with aftermarket A/T tires on it? I only ask because the things you say were true of AT tires 12-15 years ago, but aren't nearly as true now...

Lots of biting edges is the way the AT tires are going; and which is why some of them pass as "snow tires," now... They're not as good as "winter" tires at ice, but are about as good in packed snow, and are better in unpacked snow... With the OEM tires on the TB, my car with snow tires was better in the ice and snow, all around... Now that I've got the BFG ATs on the TB, it's as good as my car in ice and packed snow, and it's better in unpacked snow... (this is stopping and steering, so as to take out the 4WD/FWD advantage) FWIW, I have the Winterforce tires on my car.

The thing about the winter tires is; since they're so soft, yeah you can run them in the summer and deal with the wear; but if you live in the mountains and run switchbacks for 45 minutes at a time, they'll pretty easily overheat and get greasy on you... No thanks...

Also, modern AT tires do just fine in the rain. I dare say that modern AT tires stop better in the rain (above probably 45F) than snow tires do, and stop MUCH better in the dry than snow tires...

AT tires also clean out "OK"... They don't clean out as well as M/T tires, but they're a lot better than all seasons. They clean out as well as snow tires in the snow, but I've never taken snow tires in the mud to see how they clean out... I don't expect they do very well, though, given all the siping, and very little void area...

Mike
 

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he has an ext. he has 17's. ans said he doesnt want a snow tire. and agreed that "mud" tires arent really made for snow. and you only get 3 months of snow a year with few storms. i live in Massachusetts and my continental contrac tr's have been fine. you get what you pay for
 

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Add the Hankook ATM RF10 to the list....AWESOME tire and attractively priced. They're an AT tire with an allseason compound, wide tread to channel deep water, extra deep sipes for wet/snow/ice traction, 8-10% wider treat to road contact widge and are amazingly quiet for a tire with that wide of a tread design. They carry a M+S rating, but are a year round tire designed to help Truck/SUVs handle better in any condition....oh yeah, they're designed to be driven hard.

We got hammered just after Christmas here in SJ with 10-20" (depending on where you were) of that dry powdering stuff that makes the roads horribly slippery and my Hankooks found grip when other vehicles were sliding all over the road. On dry roads, they're very quiet for an AT tire as well.....less road noise than the Michelin Cross-Terrains that came on my Envoy and much more difficult to spin on a damp road. They also ride a bit softer or seem more compliant on tar strips and such than the Michelins were. (36-38 PSI rides better than 32 PSI did with the Michelins).

Available online and at many chains nationwide....I know the 3 Stoodges carry them locally (aka Pep Boys). - I bought mine off eBay with free shipping back in June. Personally, after my prevous experience with Goodyear tires, I'll never by another set.
 

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They carry a M+S rating, but are a year round tire designed to help Truck/SUVs handle better in any condition...
The M+S rating is not the same as the "snowflake on the mountain" rating, and does not say much at all about how they perform in the snow. Pretty much all M/T tires have the M+S rating, and are horrible in the snow.

http://www.tirerack.com/winter/tech/techpage.jsp?techid=125&

What's the difference in snow traction between an M+S (Mud and Snow) branded tire, an all-season tire and a purpose-built winter/snow tire? While many drivers probably aren't absolutely sure, it can be the difference between getting to work, getting home or getting stuck.

The original definition of M+S tires is based on the geometry of the tread design. The M+S designation was first used to differentiate the knobby, bias ply tires intended for use on muddy and/or snow-covered roads from the straight rib tires used on early cars or trucks. Tires with tread designs that meet the definition may be branded with the letters "M" and "S" in several different ways (e.g., M&S, M+S, M/S, MS, etc.) at the discretion of the tire manufacturer.

When early radial ply tires were also found to deliver more snow traction than the straight rib, bias ply tires, the tire companies introduced all-season tires. Supported by advertising, all-season tires have presented an unspoken promise that they, throughout their life, can provide traction for all seasons...through spring's rain, summer's heat, fall's cooling and winter's snow. While this combined offering has made all-season tires popular, many drivers have learned that a geometric definition doesn't guarantee winter snow and ice traction.

In 1999, The U.S. Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA) and the Rubber Association of Canada (RAC) agreed on a performance based standard to identify passenger and light truck tires that attain a traction index equal to, or greater than 110 (compared to a reference tire which is rated 100) during the specified American Society for Testing and Materials traction tests on packed snow. The new standard helps ensure that drivers can easily identify tires that provide a higher level of snow traction.

A mountain/snowflake symbol branded on the tire's sidewall identifies tires that met the required performance in snow testing. The mountain/snowflake symbol is expected to be fully implemented on new tires by now, however there still may be a few winter/snow tires in the marketplace that meet the requirements but were produced in molds manufactured before the symbol was developed.

NOTE: A Highway Safety Code regulation passed September 17, 2008 for Quebec, Canada, stipulates that:

"Between 15 December to 15 March, the owner of a taxi or passenger vehicle registered in Quebec may not put the vehicle into operation unless it is equipped with tires specifically designed for winter driving, in compliance with the standards prescribed by government regulation. The prohibition also applies to any person renting out passenger vehicles not equipped with that type of tires."

While dedicated winter/snow tires bearing the mountain/snowflake symbol are available in sizes for most passenger cars and minivans, the wide range of sizes and load ranges for tires used on crossover vehicles, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks and full size vans encouraged Quebec to temporarily expand its definition of acceptable tires to implement this law.

Alternate tires not bearing the mountain/snowflake symbol which have one or more of the following terms branded in their tire name or tire size are temporarily acceptable: Alaska, Arctic, A/T or AT Blizzard, Ice, LT, Nordic, Snow (but not mud and snow), Stud, Ultratraction or Winter.

While the inclusion of LT in this list means that any LT-metric, Flotation LT or LT-numeric sized tire is acceptable, drivers facing challenging winter driving will be best served by selecting dedicated winter/snow tires, followed by On-/Off-Road All-Terrain or Commercial Traction tires.
Starting December 15, 2014, the Highway Safety Code regulation specifies only tires bearing the mountain/snowflake symbol will be considered acceptable winter/snow tires in Quebec.

This list of temporarily acceptable tires only applies to drivers in Quebec.
 
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