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buick rainier
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It is literally a piece of steel rod, I think he hardens the end now... I had to use the Air tool like he showed there, I tapped and tapped, without luck, got the air scalier and removed the fingers, went to town, and after about 10-15 min the lifter finally popped out.. You have to remove the rocker BTW...
I literally did this on my 2006 and it worked like a champ.
 

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However there is an easier way to fix it.
I did this and it worked perfect.
I tried watching the video, and it won't play properly for me. I get about ten seconds of audio, with a still picture. Then it buffers for thirty seconds, giving me another ten seconds of audio with a different still picture.

Short story: What the hell is he doing? Freeing up the lifter plunger with a needle scaler? Or is the lifter body stuck in the lifter bore? And when he finishes, it's still knocking like mad until he finishes the test-drive.

Why not replace the defective lifter(s)? This doesn't seem to me to be a long-term fix.
 

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buick rainier
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Odd... Have you tried opening it on Youtube? There are a few videos on this, might take a little trial and error, but the procedure is the same.

More or less
1) Remove wires,
2) Remove valve cover (s)
3) find the stuck lifter (once the coils are disconnected, you can turn over the engine, and find the rocker and remove the rocker.
4) remove the upper intake and lower intake.
5) Once you know what lifter is stuck, you put the tool down into the oil passage and "tap" it until the lifter releases.
6) Break the tabs on the lower intake to deactivate the DOD mechanically
7) get the PCM reprogrammed to remove DOD electronically
8) Reassemble
 

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buick rainier
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IDK why the video is not working, it worked for me. might be an ad blocker or something you have going on. IF you look up this guy on Youtube, he has several videos on the process... I was fortunate enough that I did not need the vehicle so I took my time over a weekend... I do nothing fast.
 

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I still want to know what it is he's doing.

Is there some sort of a mechanical device or is he forcing oil under very high impact/pressure to free something up or releasing a mechanical lock ... etc?

I see it and don't get it.
 

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buick rainier
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He is using the rod to mechanically release the lifter. During operation Oil pressure collapses the lifters used for the DOD and are different than normal hydraulic lifters as they mechanically slide together to deactivate the valve. Over time, and in some cases abuse from infrequent oil changes they wear from the collapsing of them and they get stuck. You take the rod and it pushes on the lifter to separate the two pieces. It is a genius solution.

If you do this I would recommend changing the oil shortly thereafter as you will leave some shavings from the process...

Here is some information on DoD works Document ID# 1417658 2005 Ponti
 

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He is using the rod to mechanically release the lifter. During operation Oil pressure collapses the lifters used for the DOD and are different than normal hydraulic lifters as they mechanically slide together to deactivate the valve. Over time, and in some cases abuse from infrequent oil changes they wear from the collapsing of them and they get stuck. You take the rod and it pushes on the lifter to separate the two pieces. It is a genius solution.

If you do this I would recommend changing the oil shortly thereafter as you will leave some shavings from the process...

Here is some information on DoD works Document ID# 1417658 2005 Ponti
1. Except for using oil pressure to release the lock-pins, these appear to be solid lifters, not hydraulic. There's no mechanism for hydraulic pressure to take up clearance from wear. At least, that's how your link describes them.

2. Either he'd beating on the lifter body, which doesn't bode well for the lifter roller, roller axle, or cam lobe; or he's beating on the lifter plunger which doesn't make sense since it's already in the collapsed position--and which doesn't bode well for the roller, roller axle, or cam lobe. Genius solution? Seems barbaric to me.

3. If the lifters get "stuck" from "wear", I'd think that the real solution is to replace them with lifters that aren't worn.

Is there something I don't understand?
 
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buick rainier
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1. Except for using oil pressure to release the lock-pins, these appear to be solid lifters, not hydraulic. There's no mechanism for hydraulic pressure to take up clearance from wear. At least, that's how your link describes them.

2. Either he'd beating on the lifter body, which doesn't bode well for the lifter roller, roller axle, or cam lobe; or he's beating on the lifter plunger which doesn't make sense since it's already in the collapsed position--and which doesn't bode well for the roller, roller axle, or cam lobe. Genius solution? Seems barbaric to me.

3. If the lifters get "stuck" from "wear", I'd think that the real solution is to replace them with lifters that aren't worn.

Is there something I don't understand?
1) They are hydraulic roller lifters, not solid. If they were solid this would not be an issue. Chevrolet engines used hydrualic lifters in 1955, and they started using the Roller hydraulic lifters in 1987. Solid lifters require adjustment about every 10,000 miles, thus the beauty of hydraulic lifters, no need to adjust the lash on them...
2) beating on the lifter is to release it, the second video I just posted yesterday he talks about how the lifter collapses and mushrooms then ends up getting stuck. Once you release it, you need to reprogram your ECM so that they no longer collapse. You also modify the pieces in the engine so that it longer activates as he shows in the videos.
3) Absolutely it is better to replace the lifter, BUT investing $500 and driving the car for another 100K vs $2500 for a vehicle that is barely worth $3000 does not sound like a good idea, especially when this fix will be forever, and never have to worry about this happening again.

I would say, yes, you do not understand what he is doing...
I did this very process on my 2006 and it worked like a champ, I drove it for thousands of miles afterwards and never had an issue.
I have a friend who is a full time mechanic, and I showed him this video and he was so grateful because it would save him a lot of time fixing this common issue and it would save his customers money.
 

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The diagram in your link shows no mechanism for hydraulic lash adjustment. It shows a plunger that's either locked in place with pins, or collapsed to the bottom of the lifter body.

Apparently, the diagram has been "simplified" for "clarity".

Beating on the lifter is still a very bad idea. At least take the poor thing out of the engine before whacking on it, so no impact is transferred through the roller, roller pin, or onto the cam lobe.
 
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