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GreaseGirl, a couple of things.

First, the P1345 DTC IS NOT for "Electrical Short: Ignition Coil Output Stage 3" as you stated. P1345 is for a Camshaft To Crankshaft Position Correlation Fault, which goes along with a bad VVT Solenoid and the P0014 DTC.

So, perhaps you do not have a defective ignition coil (especially since you do not mention either a P0300 or P0303 code being present).

Second thing. Please use a decent quality 5W30 motor oil along with a decent oil filter. I would not use a 10w30 oil because the VVT is designed for a 5w30 oil and the operation of the VVT solenoid is dependent upon clean 5w30 motor oil, not 10W30. By the way, almost every motor oil today (except for the never heard of brands sold at some convenience stores) meets the oil specification for the TrailBlazer 4.2 engine. So, go to Walmart and purchase pretty much any oil from Walmart's SuperTech 5w30 to Mobil 1's most expensive 5w30, and either a SuperTech, Fram, Purolator, ACDelco, or Wix filter and you'll be just fine.

Good Luck!
 
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Do you have a listing of the current OBDII codes? Also, is the Reduced Power light illuminated on the instrument panel?
 

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Thanks. Did you see my earlier post to you about the ignition coil?
 

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OK, but your coil may not be bad. Did you get either a P0300 or a P0303?????
 

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I do not know what OBD II code reader you are using, but the definition shown for P1345 is incorrect.

Here is a link to a website that explains what P1345 means :


If you want just google this - 2003 Trailblazer P1345 for yourself and see that the code reader you are using is wrong.
 

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That is true.
 

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Based on the information you have provided, the problem(s) you are experiencing are all related to the camshaft system. I say that because of two of the three DTCs you are getting (P1345 and P0014). Also, the P0420 DTC (catalytic convertor efficiency is below threshold) could also be the result of the problem with the camshaft system.

If you have not already done so, go ahead and replace the VVT solenoid. While you are at it, look at the electrical connector that plugs into the VVT solenoid. Make sure the wires are intact,and that the side that goes into the VVT solenoid is clean. If it is not clean, use some rubbing alcohol to clean it.

Now, find the camshaft position sensor and look over the wires going to it. Make sure the wires are intact going into the connector body itself. Remove the connector from the camshaft position sensor and make sure the part that goes into the sensor is clean. If not, clean it using some rubbing alcohol.

If any of the wires going into the VVT Solenoid or the camshaft position sensor are loose, broken, etc, then you'll need to get a replacement connector and splice it in place of the old connector.

OK, now clear the codes and drive around and see if either the P1345 or P0014 codes return. If either code comes back, I would then replace the camshaft position sensor. They do go bad from time to time.

If only the P0420 code remains, drive the TrailBlazer on the highway to see if it stays or goes away. If it goes away, then you are all set. If the P0420 code is still there, remove the the Oxygen sensor that is before the catalytic convertor (it's mounted in the exhaust manifold) secure the loose Oxygen sensor and then drive around and see if the engine runs better and is no longer sluggish. If the sluggishness is gone, you have a catalytic converter that is partially plugged and will only get worse, so it will need to be replaced.

If the sluggishness is still present, please report back for more guidance.

Either way, please let us know how it is going.
 

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OK. The sensor is essentially located on the front of the engine on the passenger side just to the right of the radiator hose at the engine. It can be easily broken when removing the radiator hose from the engine if one is not careful. I know. I busted mine changing hoses.
 

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Again, Good Luck!
 

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OK. Good Luck!
 

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GreaseGirl95, what DTCs are now present? Did the P0014 and P1345 go away or are they still present?

In my earlier response I suggested you unplug the O2 sensor. I meant to type that you remove the upstream O2 sensor and then go for a test drive as others have suggested.

Thanks and Good Luck!
 

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OK. Thanks for the update. If I remember correctly, O'Reilly, AutoZone & Advance have a specialty loaner tool program that includes an O2 sensor socket.

Good Luck!
 

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Just get an O2 socket, then right before you want to remove the O2 sensor, run the engine for a couple of minutes to let the exhaust manifold to heat up and the fitting where the O2 sensor screws into should expand ever so slightly, It will require some effort to break free so if you have a breaker bar or a gorilla to assist you...

If at first you don't succeed, run the engine for another couple of minutes then try again. Using a penetrant like Kroil, PB Blaster,Liquid Wrench will not work because of the gasket on the O2 sensor. Just keep your fingers crossed that who ever installed the O2 sensor used a decent amount of anti-seize compound. Also, you might want to get a hose clamp to put around the O2 sensor socket down by the hexagonal portion of the sensor in order to provide a bit more clamping force from the socket to the O2 sensor.

Good Luck!
 
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It can be either. Easier way to tell is to look at the front dash to the right of the steering wheel.and immediately to the left of the radio. If there is a knob there and it is labeled with 4-Hi 4-Lo 2 WD, then it is a 4 wheel drive. NOTE, if you have a rear windshield wiper, the 4 WD know will be right above the Rear Windshield Wiper and Washer Control Knob.
 

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Supercharged111, I think the real confusion is in how people define/interpret the term "transmission flush". To many of us, a transmission flush is a process where a service facility connects a pressurized machine to the transmission system and it forces out the old fluid, sometimes sends through a "cleaning solution" and then puts in X number of quarts of new transmission fluid.

In my opinion, what you are referring to is more of a "clean version of the ole' spill and fill ATF fluid and filter change' maintenance procedure. I myself have used this procedure to pump 3 - 5 quarts of transmission fluid out of the transmission because the transmission pan did not have a drain plugs, and I was simply replacing however much AT fluid I got out with new AT fluid. Yes, your method gets more old fluid out at one time, but because I do not wait until 30,000 to 50,000 miles before I do my initial AT fluid spill and fill, I am primarily replenishing and fortifying the AT fluid's additive package.

I do this every 10,000 to 15,000 miles.to ensure my fluid does not get burned AND to ensure that I do not drastically change the chemistry of the transmission fluid. This way the varnish that has formed on the clutch material is not stripped away and it stays where it needs to be.

Now, I have never heard of a transmission in good shape failing your method or my method, I have heard of people who do have existing transmission problems who get a spill and fill transmission service performed, seeing a transmission failure shortly after the spill and fill maintenance. In all likelihood, their transmission would have failed without the maintenance.

Now, Ravalli Surfer was in the transmission repair business for a lot of years and has a great deal of valuable experience that he is generously willing to share with all who frequent the forum. Hence, he prefers to refer to maintenance or repair procedures by their industry standard names. Hence, when he "hears" someone refer to a transmission flush, he automatically thinks of the procedure involving the expensive, pressurized transmission flushing machine that many service providers use to fleece customers.

Now, with that kind of a transmission flush there is a very real chance that a transmission that has been poorly maintained over the miles and the years, and is subjected to a flushing procedure which literally shocks the automatic transmission system, will have a catastrophic failure within a very short period of time. He made a lot of money repairing/rebuilding transmissions that failed because a service provider was more interested in getting another $100 - $200 out of a customer.

So, I guess in closing I would say "...now you know the inside story..."

Regards!
 
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GreaseGirl95, thanks for letting us know what you found! A couple of recommendations regarding the parts you intend on purchasing. Get a California rated catalytic converter - they will last the longest of all the aftermarket ones and will cause the least amount of headaches going forward. This advice comes from several professional mechanics on the Bob is The Oil Guy forum (/bobistheoilguy.com) that I also subscribe to.

Secondly, purchase either Denso or ACDelco Oxygen sensors. Bosch ones create more headaches than the ones they solve.

Again, thanks for the update and good luck!
 

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GreaseGirl95 I forgot one thing. Since you are going to be moving to New England after your husband's discharge, emissions inspections and rules are much tighter there. Hence, another good reason to spend the extra $$ for a California certified cat con. Some of the New England states also require the use of CARB certified/register cat convertors as well.
 

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Way to go!!!! You did good!
 

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TrailBlazers with the 4.2L I6 engine only has two Oxygen sensors. One upstream sensor (B1S1) and one downstream (B1S2).
 
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